1. How does Mill describe the basic moral standard of utilitarianism?
2. How does he defend himself against those who say that this is a crass pleasure theory?
3. What is the basis for knowing that some pleasures are better in quality than others? Which pleasures are these? How does Mill answer those who might say that people would not always prefer the life of a human being over the life of a fully satisfied animal such as a pig?
4. Whose happiness or pleasure, then, should we promote? Are animals included?
5. According to Mill, how are we to know whether anything is desirable or good?
6. How do we know that happiness is a good in itself or as an end?
7. How does Mill respond to the assertion that there are things other than happiness that people seem to desire for their own sakes?

  • CreatedDecember 30, 2014
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