1. Ryder, a police officer in Philadelphia, was alone in his patrol car when he received a radio call of a “man with a gun.” Ryder was the first officer to arrive and was confronted by a suspect brandishing an AR-15 semiautomatic rifle pointed at him. Ryder was able to subdue him and place him into the back of his police cruiser. Backup units arrived approximately 12 minutes after the initial call. The weapon used by the suspect was later found fully loaded with the safety off. Subsequently, Ryder began to experience severe anxiety and stress from answering routine police calls, feeling that either he would be killed or have to kill somebody. A physician diagnosed Ryder as having posttraumatic stress disorder. Would Ryder be entitled to benefits under workers’ compensation laws?
2. Gentry, an employee of Export Packaging Company, reported directly to Broughton. Gentry alleged among other things that, during a period of approximately four months, Broughton subjected her to “40 hugs, 15 shoulder rubs, [and] a kiss on her cheek.” She also alleged that she was referred to as a “sex-retary.” Gentry sued her employer for sexual harassment, and the jury awarded her both compensatory and punitive damages. The company appealed. Will the company be successful in setting aside the award for damages?
3. Roll and Hold Warehouse, the employer, began circulating a new company policy relating to employee attendance. The union representing the company’s employees objected to the policy, claiming that it had never been negotiated. The company argued, among other things, that the policy was not material (important) and, therefore, that it did not need to be negotiated. The union charged the company with violating the law by failing to negotiate all terms and conditions of employment and by failing to bargain in good faith. Is the union correct in its position that the attendance policy should have been negotiated and that the company failed to bargain in good faith?

  • CreatedOctober 01, 2015
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