1. The senior executives at Siemens’ spent most of their working environment that condoned bribery outside Germany but not inside. However, they failed to take notice of the changes that Transparency International –championed by a German who was embarrassed by the double standard of his countrymen –was proposing, and that ultimately resulted in a new worldwide anti-bribery regime. Why did they ignore the change?
2. If you were Löscher, the new CEO, how would you show the employees and external stakeholders that you actually have a zero tolerance policy concerning corruption?

Siemens AG is a 160-year-old German engineering and electronics giant. It is one of Europe’s largest conglomerates, with profits in 2007 of 3.9 billion euros on revenue of 72.4 billion euros, up 6 billion euros from its 2006 revenue. It has over 475,000 employees and operations worldwide. It had also developed a corrupt organizational culture in which hundreds of millions of Euros were put into slush funds that were then used to pay bribes in order to obtain lucrative contracts. The following details have come to light:

  • CreatedOctober 28, 2014
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