1. What is the definition of the crime of obtaining goods by false pretenses? Do the facts in this case satisfy that definition? Explain.
2. Besides the defendant, who may have committed a crime in this case?
3. How might the dealership have prevented the crimes in this case?
4. Why do some states combine larceny, embezzlement, and obtaining goods by false pretenses into a single crime called theft? Discuss.
Jerome Gilding owned Temple City Power Sports, a business located in San Gabriel [California] that sold and serviced motorcycles, motorized dirt bikes [all-terrain vehicles (ATVs)], and jet skis. Customers of the dealership negotiated purchases with salespersons. The dealership made sales to customers who entered into financing agreements or paid with credit cards. In such cases, after the salesperson reached an agreement with the customer regarding an item and the manner of payment, the transaction was referred to the sales manager for approval. If approved, the transaction was sent to the dealership finance department, which collected the information necessary to process the financing agreement or credit card sale.

  • CreatedJune 18, 2014
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