1. Who are the challengers to the supremacy of justice as a social virtue, and why does Baier suggest that this is surprising?
2. What kind of ethic or perspective (influenced by the work of Carol Gilligan) is contrasted with the ethics of justice?
3. According to Gilligan, what two evils of childhood parallel the two dimensions of moral development she describes?
4. What is the tradition contrasted with Gilligan’s position, according to Baier? How do Kohlberg, Piaget, and Kant exemplify this tradition?
5. From her interview studies, what did Gilligan find about women’s moral experience and moral maturity?
6. Why do some writers believe that it will not do to say that an ethic of care is an option that only some might choose?
7. How has the tradition of rights worked both against and for women?
8. According to Baier, what is wrong with the view that stresses relationships of equality?
9. What also does Baier believe is wrong with the stress this tradition places on free choice?
10. What is the fourth feature of the Gilligan challenge to liberal orthodoxy?
11. What, then, does Gilligan think is the best moral theory?

  • CreatedDecember 30, 2014
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