(a) Was Christopher within his rights to take the car back for repairs? Explain why or why not.
(b) What logical steps might Christopher follow if he continues to be dissatisfied with the dealer’s unwillingness or inability to repair the car?
(c) Should Christopher seek any help from the court system? If so, describe what he could do without spending money on attorney’s fees.

Christopher Hardison, a high school football coach from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, purchased a new SUV for $28,000. He used the vehicle often; in fact, in less than nine months, he had put 14,000 miles on it. A 24,000-mile, two-year warranty was still in effect for the power-train equipment, although Christopher had to pay the first $100 of each repair cost. After 16,500 miles and in month 11 of driving, the car experienced some severe problems with the transmission. Christopher took the vehicle to the dealer for repairs. A week later he picked the car up, but some transmission problems remained. When Christopher took the car back to the dealer, the dealer said that no further problems could be identified. Christopher was sure that the problem was still there, and he was amazed that the dealer would not correct it. The dealer told him he would take no other action.

  • CreatedNovember 26, 2014
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