Blinder, Robinson & Co., as limited partner, and Combat Promotions, Inc., as general partner, created Combat Associates to promote an eight-round exhibition match between Muhammad Ali and Lyle Alzado, the pro football player. Combat Associates promised to pay Alzado $ 100,000 for his participation in the match. Combat Promotions was owned entirely by Alzado, his accountant, and his professional agent. Alzado was also vice president of Combat Promotions. Blinder, Robinson used its Denver office as a ticket outlet for the match, gave two parties to promote the match, and provided a meeting room for Combat Associates' meetings. Meyer Blinder, president of Blinder, Robinson, personally appeared on a TV talk show and gave TV interviews to promote the match.
Few tickets were sold, and the match was a financial debacle. Alzado received no payments for participating in the match. Alzado sued Blinder, Robinson claiming that since it acted like a general partner it had the liability of a general partner. The case was decided under the law of the RULPA. Was Blinder, Robinson liable to Alzado? Would Blinder, Robinson be liable to Alzado under the ULPA of 2001?

  • CreatedJuly 16, 2014
  • Files Included
Post your question