Question

Diners at a restaurant were informed on entering that they would be receiving a free glass of wine, which they were told was Cabernet Sauvignon. However, it was not. It was a cheap wine sold for $2 a bottle, popularly known as Two Buck Chuck. Half of the diners were told that the wine was from a new California winery.
The other half of diners were informed that the wine they would receive was from a new North Dakota winery. (There are no wineries in North Dakota and even if there were the wine produced would not be considered excellent.) The restaurant featured a fixed menu so that all diners had exactly the same meal. The goal of the experiment was to determine whether the perceived quality of the wine affected their dining experience. The amount of food consumed (measured as a percentage of the amount originally served that was consumed by the diner, so that 100 represent a diner who cleaned his or her plate) and the amount of time spent in the restaurant was recorded.
a. Is there enough statistical evidence to infer that diners who believe they are drinking a fine wine (California wine) eat more than diners who believe they are drinking an inferior wine?
b. Can we conclude that diners who believe they are drinking a fine wine (California wine) spend more time in the restaurant than diners who believe they are drinking an inferior wine?




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  • CreatedFebruary 03, 2015
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