Question

Do faculty and students have similar perceptions of what types of behavior are inappropriate in the classroom? This question was examined by the author of the article “Faculty and Student Perceptions of Classroom Etiquette” (Journal of College Student Development (1998): 515– 516). Each individual in a random sample of 173 students in general education classes at a large public university was asked to judge various behaviors on a scale from 1 (totally inappropriate) to = (totally appropriate). Individuals in a random sample of 98 faculty members also rated the same behaviors. The mean rating for three of the behaviors studied are shown here (the means are consistent with data provided by the author of the article). The sample standard deviations were not given, but for purposes of this exercise, assume that they are all equal to 1.0.
a. Is there sufficient evidence to conclude that the mean “appropriateness” score assigned to wearing a hat in class differs for students and faculty?
b. Is there sufficient evidence to conclude that the mean “appropriateness” score assigned to addressing an instructor by his or her first name is higher for students than for faculty?
c. Is there sufficient evidence to conclude that the mean “appropriateness” score assigned to talking on a cell phone differs for students and faculty? Does the result of your test imply that students and faculty consider it acceptable to talk on a cell phone during class?


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  • CreatedSeptember 19, 2015
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