Edwin Bull was the owner of an 80-foot fishing trawler named the Bull Head that had been leased for use in dismantling a bridge over the Illinois River at Pekin, Illinois. At the termination of the lease, the Bull Head was towed upriver to Morris, Illinois, not operating on its own power. At Morris, a tugboat owned by Iowa Marine Repair Corporation was used to remove the Bull Head from the tow and to move it to the south bank of the river where it was tied up. Several months later, the Bull Head was moved across the river by Iowa Marine and moored at a place on the north bank where it maintained its fleeting operations. The Bull Head remained there for several years and greatly deteriorated. Iowa Marine sent Bull a bill for switching, fleeting, and other services. Bull refused to pay and brought suit against Iowa Marine to recover possession of the boat. In turn, Iowa Marine claimed that it had a mechanic's lien on the Bull Head and that the boat should be sold to satisfy the lien. Illinois law provides that any architect, contractor, subcontractor, materialman, or other person furnishing services, labor, or material for the purpose of, or in constructing, building, altering, repairing or ornamenting a boat, barge, or watercraft shall have a lien on such boat for the value of such services, labor, or material in the same manner as in this act provided for the purpose of building, altering, repairing, or ornamenting a house or other building. Does Iowa Marine have a valid mechanic's lien on the boat for its switching, fleeting, and storage services?

  • CreatedJuly 16, 2014
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