In each of the following situations, label the audiences as gatekeeper, primary, secondary, auxiliary, or watchdog audiences (all audiences may not be in each scenario):
1. Kent, Carol, and Jose are planning to start a website design business. However, before they can get started, they need money. They have developed a business plan and are getting ready to seek funds from financial institutions for starting their small business.
2. Barbara’s boss asked her to write a direct mail letter to potential customers about the advantages of becoming a preferred member of their agency’s travel club. The letter will go to all customers of the agency who are over 65 years old.
3. Paul works for the mayor’s office in a big city. As part of a citywide cost-cutting measure, a blueribbon panel has recommended requiring employees who work more than 40 hours in a week to take compensatory time off rather than being paid overtime. The only exceptions will be the police and fire departments. The mayor asks Paul to prepare a proposal for the city council, which will vote on whether to implement the change. Before they vote, council members will hear from (1) citizens, who will have an opportunity to read the proposal and communicate their opinions to the city council; (2) mayors’ offices in other cities, who may be asked about their experiences; (3) union representatives, who may be concerned about the reduction in income that will occur if the proposal is implemented; (4) department heads, whose ability to schedule work might be limited if the proposal passes; and (5) the blue-ribbon panel and good government lobbying groups. Council members come up for reelection in six months.
4. Sharon, Steven’s boss at Bigster Corporation, has asked him to write an e-mail for everyone in her division, informing them of HR’s new mandatory training sessions on new government regulations affecting Bigster’s services.

  • CreatedMarch 12, 2014
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