Many tourists choose a vacation destination on the basis of the newness or uniqueness (i.e., the novelty) of the itinerary. Texas A&M University professor J. Petrick investigated the relationship between novelty and vacationing golfers’ demographics (Annals of Tourism Research, April 2002). Data were obtained from a mail survey of 393 golf vacationers to a large coastal resort in the southeastern United States. Several measures of novelty level (on a numerical scale) were obtained for each vacationer, including “change from routine,” “thrill,” “boredom-alleviation,” and “surprise.” The researcher employed four independent variables in a regression model to predict each measure of novelty. The independent variables were x1 = number of rounds of golf per year, x2 = total number of golf vacations taken, x3 = number of years the respondent played golf, and x4 = average golf score.
a. Give the hypothesized equation of a first-order model for y = change from routine.
b. A test of H0: β3 = 0 versus Ha: β3 < 0 yielded a p -value of .005. Interpret this result if α = .01.
c. The estimate of b3 was found to be negative. On the basis of this result (and the result of part b), the researcher concluded that “those who have played golf for more years are less apt to seek change from their normal routine in their golf vacations.” Do you agree with this statement? Explain.
d. The regression results for the three other dependent measures of novelty are summarized in the accompanying table. Give the null hypothesis for testing the overall adequacy of each first-order regression model.
e. Give the rejection region for the test mentioned in part d. Use α = .01.
f. Use the test statistics reported in the table and the rejection region from part e to conduct the test for each of the dependent measures of novelty.
g. Verify that the p-values in the table support the conclusions you drew in part f.
h. Interpret the values of R2 reported in the table.

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