Showing 11 to 20 of 873 Questions
  • (a) Check whether the binomial approximation is acceptable in each of the following hypergeometric situations. (b) Find the binomial approximation (using Appendix A) for each probability requested. (c) Check the accuracy of your approximation by using Excel to find the actual hypergeometric probability. a. N 5 100, n 5 3, s 5 40, P(X 5 3)

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  • (a) Find the mean and variance in Exercise 5.64 of the random variable X representing the number of persons among 2000 that die from the respiratory infection.(b) According to Chebyshev's theorem, there is a probability of at least 3/4 that the number of persons to die among 2000 persons infected will fall within what interval?

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  • (a) Find the mean and variance in Exercise 5.65 of the random variable X representing the number of persons among 10,000 who make an error in preparing their income tax returns.(b) According to Chebyshev's theorem, there is a probability of at least 8/9 that the number of persons who make errors in preparing their income tax returns among

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  • (a) In Exercise 5.9, how many of the 15 trucks would you expect to have blowouts?(b) According to Chebyshev's theorem, there is a probability of at least 3/4 that the number of trucks among the next 15 that have blowouts will fall in what interval?

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  • (a) In the previous exercise, suggest the approximate probability of success in each scenario. (b) Is success a desirable or undesirable thing in each of these scenarios? (a) Guessing on a true-false exam question; (b) Checking to see whether an ER patient has health insurance; (c) Dialing a talkative friend's cell phone; (d) Going on a 1

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  • (a) State the values that X can assume in each hypergeometric scenario. (b) Use the hypergeometric PDF formula to find the probability requested. (c) Check your answer by using Excel. i. N = 10, n = 3, s = 4, P(X = 3) ii. N = 20, n = 5, s = 3, P(X = 2) iii. N = 36, n = 4, s = 9, P(X = 1) iv. N = 50, n = 7, s = 10, P(X = 3)

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  • (a) Suppose that you throw 4 dice, probability that you get at least one 1. Find (b) Suppose that you throw 2 dice 24 times. Find the probability that you get at least one (1, 1), that is, you roll "snake;-eyes." [Note: The probability of part (a) is greater than the probability of part (b).]

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  • (a) Why might the number of calls received per minute at a re station not be a Poisson event? (b) Name two other events per unit of time that might violate the assumptions of the Poisson model.

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  • (a) Why might the number of yawns per minute by students in a warm classroom not be a Poisson event? (b) Give two additional examples of events per unit of time that might violate the assumptions of the Poisson model, and explain why.

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  • (Use computer) Assume that X is a hyper-geometric random variable with N = 50, S = 20, and n = 5. Calculate the following probabilities.a. P(X = 2)b. P(X ≥ 2)c. P(X ≤ 3)

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