Question

On January 1, 2011, Garner issued 10-year $200,000 face value, 6% bonds at par. Each $1,000 bond is convertible into 30 shares of Garner $2, par value, ordinary shares. Interest on the bonds is paid annually on December 31. The market rate for Garner’s non-convertible debt is 9%. The company has had 10,000 ordinary shares (and no preference shares) outstanding throughout its life. None of the bonds have been converted as of the end of 2012. (Ignore all tax effects.)
Accounting
(a) Prepare the journal entry Garner would have made on January 1, 2011, to record the issuance of the bonds and prepare an amortization table for the first three years of the bonds.
(b) Garner’s net income in 2012 was $30,000 and was $27,000 in 2011. Compute basic and diluted earnings per share for Garner for 2012 and 2011.
(c) Assume that all of the holders of Garner’s convertible bonds convert their bonds to shares on January 2, 2013, when Garner’s shares are trading at $32 per share. Garner pays $50 per bond to induce bondholders to convert. Prepare the journal entry to record the conversion, using the book value method.
Analysis
Show how Garner Company will report income and EPS for 2012 and 2011. Briefly discuss the importance of IFRS for EPS to analysts evaluating companies based on price-earnings ratios. Consider comparisons for a company over time, as well as comparisons between companies at a point in time.
Principles
In order to converge U.S. GAAP and IFRS, U.S. standard-setters (the FASB) are considering whether the equity element of a convertible bond should be reported as equity. Describe how the journal entry you made in part (a) above would differ under U.S. GAAP. In terms of the accounting principles discussed in Chapter 2, what does IFRS for convertible debt accomplish that U.S. GAAP potentially sacrifices? What does U.S. GAAP for convertible debt accomplish that IFRS potentially sacrifices?



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  • CreatedJune 17, 2013
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