Question

The computer age has allowed teachers to use electronic tutorials to motivate their students to learn. Issues in Accounting Education published the results of a study that showed that an electronic tutorial, along with intentionally induced peer pressure, was effective in enhancing preclass preparations and in improving class attendance, test scores, and course evaluations when used by students studying tax accounting. Suppose a similar study is conducted at your school using an electronic study guide (ESG) as a tutor for students of accounting principles. For one course section, the students were required to use a new ESG computer program that generated and scored chapter review quizzes and practice exams, presented textbook chapter reviews, and tracked progress. Students could use the computer to build, take, and score their own simulated tests and review materials at their own pace before they took their formal in-class quizzes and exams composed of different questions. The same instructor taught the other course section, used the same textbook, and gave the same daily assignments, but he did not require the students to use the ES
G. Identical tests were administered to both sections, and the mean scores of all tests and assignments at the end of the year were tabulated:
Do these results show that the mean scores of tests and assignments for students taking accounting principles with an ESG to help them are significantly greater than the mean scores of those not using an ESG? Use a 0.01 level of significance.
a. Solve using the p-value approach.
b. Solve using the classical approach.


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  • CreatedAugust 28, 2015
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