The slogan for the movie Godzilla was “Size does matter.” Should this be the slogan for America as well? Many marketers seem to believe so. The average serving size for a fountain drink has gone from 12 ounces to 20 ounces. An industry consultant explains that the 32-ounce Big Gulp is so popular because “people like something large in their hands. The larger the better.” Hardee’s Monster Burger, complete with two beef patties and five pieces of bacon, weighs in at 63 grams of fat and more than 900 calories. Clothes have ballooned as well: Kickwear makes women’s jeans with 40-inch-diameter legs. The standard for TV sets used to be 19 inches; now it is 32 inches. Hulking SUVs have replaced tiny sports cars as the status vehicle of the new millennium. One consumer psychologist theorized that consuming big things is reassuring: “Large things compensate for our vulnerability,” she says. “It gives us insulation, the feeling that we’re less likely to die.” What is up with our fascination with bigness? Is this a uniquely American preference? Do you believe that “bigger is better”? Is this a sound marketing strategy?

  • CreatedJuly 10, 2015
  • Files Included
Post your question