To review your skills in developing a class diagram, develop a domain model class diagram, including associations and multiplicities, based on the following narrative.
A clinic with three dentists and several dental hygienists needs a system to help administer patient records. This system does not keep any medical records. It only processes patient administration. birth, gender, date of first visit, and date of last visit. Patient records are grouped together under a household. A household has attributes such as name of head of household, address, and telephone number. Each household is also associated with an insurance carrier record. The insurance carrier record contains name of insurance company, address, billing contact person, and telephone number.
In the clinic, each dental staff person also has a record that tracks who works with a patient (dentist, dental hygienist, x-ray technician). Because the system focuses on patient administration records, only minimal information is kept about each dental staff person, such as name, address, and telephone number. Information is maintained about each office visit, such as date, insurance copay amount (amount paid by the patient), paid code, and amount actually paid. Each visit is for a single patient, but, of course, a patient will have many office visits in the system. During each visit, more than one dental staff person may be involved by doing a procedure. For example, the x-ray technician, dentist, and dental hygienist may all be involved on a single visit. In fact, some dentists are specialists in such things as crown work, and even multiple dentists may be involved with a patient. For each staff person does procedure in a visit combination (many-to-many), detailed information is kept about the procedure. This information includes the type of procedure, a description, the tooth involved, the copay amount, the total charge, the amount paid, and the amount the insurance company denied.
Finally, the system also keeps track of invoices. There are two types of invoices: invoices to insurance companies and invoices to heads of household. Both types of invoices are fairly similar, listing each visit, the procedures involved, the patient copay amount, and the total due. Obviously, the totals for the insurance company are different from the patient amounts owed. Even though an invoice is a report (when printed), it also maintains some information such as date sent, total amount, amount already paid, amount due and the total received, date received, and total denied. (Insurance companies do not always pay all they are billed.)

  • CreatedDecember 27, 2012
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