Latest Posted Questions - Computer Science

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You are a manager of a Wally's Training Gym and you encourage your trainers to enroll new members. Input is the trainer's last name and the number of new enrollees. Output is the number of trainers who have enrolled members in each of three categories: 0-5 new members, 6-10 new members, and 11 to 15 new members. Write an application that allows the user to enter 15 names and the number of new members they have enrolled into an array. Output is to display the number of trainers who are in each category. Use good programming techniques that you have learned throughout the course. Use appropriate variable names, use an array to store the names and number of new enrollees, and use prompts for the input and labels with the display. Save your file using the naming format LASTNAME_FIRSTNAME_M07-FP You may write your program in Raptor. Documentation is very important for this course and in the field. For all Raptors and all programs, an expectation is that comments will be incorporated into all assignments. For this assignment, only the header comments will be required. Both header comments and step comments are encouraged as they will help for logic to be better. Header comments should include the following: Name of the Raptor program Author of the Raptor program Version of the Raptor program and the date of its last revision Summary/goal of the Raptor program Variables used with a short description of the variable, as well as the format of the data (e.g. datatype) Required Create a program using python pseudo code.

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Mr. Ellis lives in rural Victoria. His property is off the electricity grid and has no independent source of power. On 22 October 2012, he signed a purchase agreement with Bailey Engineering Pty Ltd for a 3.6kW hybrid power system. The model of the system was Firefly CYGNUS 3.6. He dealt with Mr. Bailey, director of the company. The purpose of the system he purchased was to provide power through the combination of a wind turbine and solar panels. The purchase price of $19,800 included full installation. Mr. Ellis paid a deposit of $11,900. The balance of $7,900 was to be paid when the installation was completed and the system generated power as intended. Mr. Ellis is a tamer and that was the first time he bought a hybrid power system. Footnote number five in the agreement contained a clause stating that "The batteries installed in the system are supplied by Bosch Germany. Thus, Bailey Engineering Pty Ltd will not be responsible for their functioning as well as any damage caused by them". Since Mr. Ellis did not read the footnotes in the agreement, he was unaware of that clause when he signed the agreement. One day before the meeting to sign the contract, Mr. Ellis received an email from Mr. Bailey. The email was entitled "Advice on Maintenance". Apart from the detailed information regarding the way the system should be maintained, the last lines of the email also stated that "The batteries installed in the system are supplied by Bosch Germany. Thus, Bailey Engineering Pty Ltd will not be responsible for their functioning as well as any damage caused by them". Mr Ellis opened the email but read it in hurry and thus missed the statement in the last lines of the email. The receipt of the deposit also contained the same statement. However, it was not clear whether Mr. Ellis checked the receipt or not. The hybrid power system was installed at Mr. Ellis's property by Bailey Engineering staff on 23 October 2012. No Energy Efficient Light Bulbs were provided to Mr. Ellis. To reduce costs, Bailey Engineering used the batteries made in China by Amperex Technology to install in the system for Mr. Ellis. When Bailey Engineering staff finished the installation, they turned the system on and left the property. The system ran for a couple of hours and then turned off by itself. Mr. Ellis tried to restart the system many times but the problem persisted. During the time the system appeared running, it did not generate any power. On 25 October 2012, Mr. Ellis called Bailey Engineering to report the problem. Bailey Engineering staff came and discovered that the batteries malfunctioned and did not charge sufficiently to generate power. Specifically, it was a 220voltage system, if the battery charge dropped to 200voltage it would shut off. After being informed of the problem and its cause, Mr. Bailey called Mr. Ellis and told him that "if you pay an extra $5000, we will change the batteries and make the system work for you". Mr. Ellis was in need of power and thus he agreed to the requirement. On 7 November 2012, the batteries of the hybrid power system were replaced by Bailey Engineering staff and the system started generating power. The replacement batteries were also made in China by Ampere Technology. The hybrid power system worked for five days but then the batteries overheated and exploded, destroying the entire roof of Mr. Ellis’s house. Mr. Ellis had to spend $30,000 to repair his house. During the time the system worked, the batteries can be charged up to 210 voltage only. Being frustrated with the problems, Mr. Ellis refused to pay Bailey Engineering the remaining $7,900 and $5,000. Please discuss who can sue whom for what? (all relevant legal issues should be discussed regardless of whether these relevant legal issues are successful or not). Do not discuss tort law.

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Any organization is working hard to address the opportunities and storage challenges associated with “big data.” Industry experts estimate that the total volume of data is doubling every 18 months and the vast majority of new data being generated is in business domains. MasterCard International (www.mastercard.com ) is no stranger to wrestling with the issues associated with massive databases. MasterCard has amassed a data warehouse that is more than 100 -terabytes in size and company insiders expect that it will grow to more than 1.8 petabytes. The growth of MasterCard’s data warehouse is fueled by a client/server network that, on average, handles 140 million credit card transactions per hour on behalf of more than 25,000 financial institutions [WALL08]. In 2007, MasterCard's worldwide network processed 18.7 billion transactions totaling approximately $2.3 trillion. MasterCard’s computer facility authorizes, clears, and settles each credit card transaction in real-time as a cardholder's credit card is swiped. MasterCard’s bank and business clients expect the system to be fast and accessible. To meet these expectations, MasterCard expects its network to have a response time of 140 milliseconds per transaction (or less). It also has implemented sufficient redundancy and failover systems to be able to C3-2 promise its customers 99.999 percent network availability. Needless to say, MasterCard customers also expect the transaction processing and data storage systems to be secure. For continued success, it is important for MasterCard to grow its volume of credit card transactions. To do this, the company works to expand its base of bank clients and business partners by offering them an attractive mix of products and services . Part of their efforts is directed toward help ing its clients increase the number of customers who hold a MasterCard and use them to make purchases. To remain competitive against ot her credit card issuers such as American Express, Discover, and Visa, MasterCard must also continue to grow its volume of c redit card transactions and it has learned that one of the best ways to do this is by being a good business partner for its clients. In addition to credit cards, MasterCard offers debit cards, prepaid cards, smart cards with embedded chips, and c ontactless cards. It also has business card programs for commercial and public sector organizations of all sizes. MasterCard partners with its customers to create customized loyalty programs and reward solutions to provide incentives for cardholders to use MasterCard to make purchases. By helping its customers identify the benefits that services that are most appealing to their cardholders, Mast erCard is able to help its partners increase customer satisfaction. MasterCard’s global processing system enables customers to extend their loyalty programs worldwide. Hence, it is not surprising that MasterCard has been successful in partnering with airlines and hotel chains on loyalty programs. MasterCard’s Data Warehouse Strategy MasterCard’s data warehouse has emerged to play an important role in the company’s competitive strategy. This global data repository has become a C3-3 business intelligence (BI) engine that helps the credit card giant and its clients make more effective business decisions. Planning for the data warehouse began in the mid -the 1990s. Interestingly, MasterCard’s executive team immediately grasped the data warehouse concept recommended by the IT division as a potential game-changer. MasterCard executives typically required a detailed business case justifying IT investment recommendations, but in this case, the executives instantly recognized the proposed data warehouse as a strategic move to give MasterCard a competitive edge. Specifically, MasterCard wanted to improve its market share. At the time, MasterCard accounted for only about 25% of charges for goods sold worldwide using credit cards, with Visa accounting for 50%. Since the creation of the data warehouse, MasterCard’s market share increased to 31%. Although Visa continues to be the industry leader, MasterCard’s role as a global leader in credit card processing has strengthened [BASE11]. Financial institutions that use MasterCard rely on the history of credit card transactions to provide information for targeted marketing and business planning. For example, a bank that issues credit cards might notice a large volume of charges for flights on a specific airline. The bank can use this information to negotiate a deal with the airline to provide special offers and incentives to cardholders. Similar promotional opportunities could be offered to a hotel chain that would provide additional incentives (such as “stay two nights and get a third night free”) for using MasterCard to re-serve and pay for a room. MasterCard’s B I and Reporting Tools MasterCard runs a combination of homegrown and off-the-shelf analytic tools to identify buying trends, credit card fraud, and other useful information. The company can correlate and analyze transactions to C3-4 to determine a consumer's interest or detect anomalies that suggest a card has been stolen. MasterCard offers bank clients access to these tools, as well as custom reports. Among the signature applications provided by MasterCard is its Portfolio Analytics suite of BI and reporting tools. This suite includes a wide range of standard reports that let members analyze transactions every day, week, or month and compare the results to different parts of the country, other parts of the world, or predefined groups of similar banks. Another popular tool is the MasterCard Marketing Center, which helps its customers monitor, analyze, and develop campaigns to increase the use of their cards. For example, a card issuer in Los Angeles might use the data to see how many cardholders spent $25 or more in January and February on sporting goods at Wal -Mart stores. Then it might propose to Wal- Mart a mail marketing campaign before the opening of the baseball season, tied to heavy spenders with an affinity to the Dodgers or Angels. A card issuer in New York City could use MasterCard’s BI and reporting tools to identify patterns in restaurant charges for its most affluent cardholders. This information could be used to develop an “insider’s guide” to NYC “hidden gems for food and wine ” to share with select groups of other MasterCard holders. The process used by MasterCard customers to make access the data warehouse to populate reports or perform BI queries is illustrated in general terms in Figure C3.1. Such transactions proceed in the following way: 1. Member bank connects to MasterCard facility, known as MasterCard Online. This could be by Internet, by means of a mobile access service, or by means of a private wide area network, such as a frame relay network. In the case of Internet access, all traffic must go through a firewall, which assures that unwanted traffic is blocked. 2. User authenticates to MasterCard Online. A dedicated group of servers is assigned the task of authenticating all incoming transaction requests to assure that the user has permission to use the facility and to specify the user's level of privilege. C3-5 3. MasterCard Online verifies user-product licensing. This has to do with which business enterprise software tools the bank client is able to use. 4. User request is forwarded to a transaction server, which invokes the appropriate application software for this transaction. The application translates the request into the corresponding database requests and updates. 5. The transaction server forwards a transaction request to the data warehouse, which processes the request and returns a response to the member user. C3-6 MasterCard continues to expand the size of the data repository and the toolset. The goal is to include every transaction handled by members over a three-year period, capturing the dollar amount, the card number, the location, and the merchant in each instance. But it is the set of applications provided to members that is crucial in gaining a competitive edge. MasterCard aims to gain favor with portfolio managers and member banks, who decide whether to push Visa or MasterCard. If the online tools help those managers analyze the profitability of the cards in their portfolio better or gain more customers and transaction volume faster, then MasterCard benefits. To keep ahead of Visa, the MasterCard IT shop has dozens of full-time developers tasked to come up with new tools and reports to put in the hands of banks and other clients. The developers also work with MasterCard clients to create repeatable custom reports that can focus on any aspect of authorizing a card or transaction, including chargebacks for disputed amounts and fraud. MasterCard has approximately 1.7 billion cardholders worldwide and MasterCard can be used for purchases at more than 33 million locations. While this might seem like sufficient market penetration, MasterCard is always looking for new ways to increase the volume of purchase transactions. Several new payment systems have been implemented including “tag & go” PayPass cards that speed up purchasing by avoiding the need to swipe a card [LAWS12]. PayPass digital wallets have also been developed to speed up the payment process for online purchases. MasterCard has embraced smartphone payment systems and are rolling out smartphone and tablet PC apps that enable banks and business clients to use mobile devices to monitor credit usage patterns and use its data warehouse BI and reporting tools [TELE12]. As mobility becomes more pervasive, MasterCard’s data repository will be modified to assimilate mobile transactions with traditional credit card transactions. This will almost certainly result in a n enriched set of BI and reporting tools. C3-7 Discussion Points 1. MasterCard managers are motivated to increase (1) the number of individuals who have and use a MasterCard credit card, (2 ) the number of banks and ot her clients who issue MasterCards to customers and/or employees, and (3) the number of locations that accept MasterCard payments. Discuss how MasterCard could use its data warehouse to help it expand each of these customer bases. 2. MasterCard makes its analytics tools available to all of its member banks and other issuers. It knows that getting its clients to use these tools can be critical to keeping them as loyal customers. Discuss the steps that MasterCard can take to promote greater use of its BI and reporting tools by its clients. Who do you think larger or smaller clients will benefit most from MasterCard’s analytics tools? Why? 3. Do some Internet research to identify examples of “tap & go” applications. What are some typical types of “tap & go” payment applications and what growth trends are expected? Do you think that there are limits to the types of applications that “tap & go” payments can be used for? Why or why not? 4. Do some research on the extent to which Mas MasterCard's PayPass digital wallet is being embraced as a payment mechanism for online purchases. What are the advantages and disadvantages of digital wallets such as PayPass? What can MasterCard do to encourage online merchants to accept PayPass digital wallet payments? Supporting mobility and smartphone apps is important to MasterCard. What challenges does MasterCard face in rolling out smartphone payment systems? Which of these do you think will be most difficult to address? Why? Sources [BASE11] Basenese, L. “Stock Wars: Visa vs. MasterCard.” Wall Street Daily, May 18, 2011. Retrieved online at: http://www.wallstreetdaily.com/2011/05/18/visa -versus -MasterCard -s tock/ . [LAWS12] Lawson, S. “MasterCard, Startup PaidPiper Tap into Credit Cards for Mobile Payments.” CIO, May 4, 2012. Retrieved online at: http://www.cio.com.au/article/423876/mastercard_startup_paidpiper_tap_in to_credit_cards_mobile_payments/ C3-8 [WALL08] Wallgum, T. “The Man Behind MasterCard’s 100 -Terabyte Data Warehouse.” Computerworld, July 17, 2008. Retrieved online at: http://news.idg.no/cw/art.cfm?id=32FCBC8A- 17A4-0F78- 316BA999B7AFE095 [TELE12] The Telegraph , “MasterCard to Let Users Pay by Smartphone App.” May 17, 2012. Retrieved online at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/borrowing/creditcards/ 9253573/Mastercard -to -let- users -pay -via -smartphone -app.html

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Estimating the elasticity matrir. In this problem you create a standard model of how demand varies with the prices of a set of products, based on some observed data. There aren different products, with (positive) prices given by the n-vector p. The prices are held constant over some period, say, a day. The (positive) demand for the products over the day is given by the n-vector d. The demand in any particular day varies, but it is thought to be (approximately) a function of the prices. The units of the prices and demands don't really matter in this problem. Demand could be measured in 10,000 units, and prices in $100. The nominal prices are given by the n-vector pom You can think of these as the prices that have been charged in the past for the products. The nominal demand is the n-vector dnom. This is the average value of the demand, when the prices are set to phom (The actual daily demand fluctuates around the value dnom.) You know both pom and dnom. We will describe the prices by their (fractional) variations from the nominal values, and the same for demands. We define 8P and dd as the (vectors of) relative price change and demand change: nom Pi - p di – dnom i = 1,..., n. nom nom So 8 = +0.05 means that the price for product 3 has been increased by 5% over its nominal value, and 8g = -0.04 means that the demand for product 5 in some day is 4% below its nominal value. Your task is to build a model of the demand as a function of the price, of the form sd z ESP, where E is the n xn elasticity matrix. You don't know E, but you do have the results of some experiments in which the prices were changed a bit from their nominal values for one day, and the day's demands were recorded. This data has the form (P1, d1), ..., (PN, dN), where p; is the price for day i, and d; is the observed demand. (a) (10 points) Explain how you would estimate E, given this price-demand data. Be sure to explain how you will test for, and (if needed) avoid over-fit. Hint. You might find it easier to separately fit the models 8 eȚ SP, where ē; is the ith row of E. (We use the tilde above e; to avoid conflict with the notation for unit vectors.)

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Using "Java" programme Create a class Account that contains two instance variables (String name, double balance). Initially, the balance is 0. The class also contains two methods: withdraw that takes a double 1. parameter amount and reduces the balance value by that amount, if there is sufficient balance. Otherwise, the withdraw method throws a user-defined exception called InsufficientBalance. The other method is deposit that takes a double parameter amount and increases the balance value by that amount. For both of these methods if the argument amount passed is negative both will throw another user defined exception called InvalidAmountArgument. InsufficientBalance class's constructor takes two parameters: the current-balance and withdraw-amount whereas InvalidAmountArgument class's constructor takes only a single argument that is the negative-amount passed to those methods. The InsufficientBalance class sets the exception message (using super call in the constructor) as follows: Insufficient Balance. Current balance 100 is lower than the withdrawal amount 500. Here, the constructor parameters, current-balance value is 100 and withdraw-amount value is 500. And the InvalidAmountArgument class sets the exception message as follows: Invalid Amount Value -100. Amount can't be negative. Here, the constructor parameters, negative-amount value is -100. Now, write the classes Account and InsufficientBalance 2. Create a Class named Bishop. Make sure the class cannot be inherited. If there have already been 5 objects initiated for this class, trying to initiate the 6th object, the constructor will throw a user-defined exception BishopCreationLimitExceeded. This class has an instance method named printObjectNumber which will print the object creation sequence number for the object for which you are calling the method as follows: This Bishop Object number is 3. Here, 3 is the object creation sequence number that is the third call to new Bishop() in your code that initiated the object. The BishopCreationLimitExceeded class sets the exception message (using super call in the constructor) as follows: The maximum number of bishop objects can be 5. You can define instance variables in the Bishop class if you need them.

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You need no technical experience whatsoever to analyze and evaluate this Microsoft Face API software, which is an artificial intelligence service that analyzes faces in images. The objective of this software is to determine if two photos containing faces refer to the same person. To begin, take two selfies, each in different locations or with different expressions; alternatively, take a selfie of yourself and a photo of someone else, or two photos that are not of yourself. Next, go to Microsoft's facial recognition page. (Links to an external site.) Scroll down until you find an image that looks something like the image below. Submit your own two images to Microsoft's facial recognition page. (Links to an external site.) Note: if you're on a Mac, uploading your images may be problematic. If this is the case, use one of the sample couplet photos provided by Microsoft on the same page as the app. On a Word 2019 document with your two images at the top. Below the photos, provide a numbered list to answer following: Type the application's verification result on the Word document. This indicates how confident the application is regarding the accuracy of its own evaluation. Type your answer like this: " Confidence is X " (where X is a numeral. Do not use quotation marks; do not type extra words or characters). On the same Word document, type your evaluation of the application with one of these phrases "my conclusion regarding the application's confidence in itself is that it is extremely confident that the persons in the two photos are the same person"; "my conclusion regarding the application's confidence in itself is that the application is very confident that the persons in the two photos are the same"; "my conclusion regarding the application's confidence in itself is that the application is somewhat confident that the person in the two photos are the same"; "my conclusion regarding the application's confidence in itself is that the application is not very confident that the persons in the two photos are the same"; "my conclusion regarding the application's confidence in itself is that the application is way off ." 3. "I came to my conclusion_______________. " Fill in the blank. How did you come to your conclusion? 4. Using just a numeral (no words or extra characters), type the verification result of a perfect match of the faces (for example, if the same two photos were uploaded). 5. What is the the relationship of the two faces pictured? (If you are using random samples, write "I don't know."

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Case study: Pearl Engineering CompanyPearl Engineering Company was a large heavy-engineering unit. It attached great importance to the recruitment and training of its senior supervisors. Apart from selecting them from within the organization, the company recruited, every alternate year, about ten young engineering graduates and offered them training for a period of two years, before they were appointed as senior supervisors. Such appointments were made to about 40 per cent of the vacancies of senior supervisors that occurred in the organization. This was considered necessary by management as a planned programme of imparting vitality to the organization. Besides, many of the old-timers, who had risen from the ranks, did not possess the necessary academic background with the result that they could not keep pace with the technological changes. Management also believed that in the rapidly changing condition of industry, a bank of technically competent supervisors played a pivotal role, besides serving as a pool from which to select future departmental managers.Engineering Graduates were selected from amongst those who applied in response to an all-India advertisement. For the selection of one engineer, on an average, eight applicants were called for interview. A selection committee consisting of the General Manager, the Production Manager, the Personnel Manager and the Training Officer interviewed and selected the candidates. The selection interview was preceded by a written test and only those who secured 40 per cent marks qualified for interview.The engineers thus selected had to undergo a two-year intensive theoretical and practical training. A well-staffed and equipped Training Institute was directly responsible for the training of the graduate engineers, besides training trade apprentices and operatives required by the company. Lectures on theoretical subjects were given at the Training Institute and practical training was imparted in all the works departments under the guidance of qualified and experienced instructors. A few lectures by senior officers of the company were also arranged to acquaint them with the company policies on different matters. During the last quarter of their two-year training programme they were deputed to work fulltime to familiarize themselves with the conditions in departments where they were to be absorbed eventually.On successful completion of training, the graduate engineers were offered appointments, depending on their performance and aptitude as revealed during training. On placement in the work departments, however, most of them faced some difficulty or the other.According to management, some of the heads of departments, who were themselves not qualified engineers, did not have sufficient confidence in these younger men. They preferred the subordinates who came up from the ranks to hold positions of responsibility. A few discredited them saying that it would take years before these youngsters could pick up the job. Besides, some of the employees, whose promotional opportunities were adversely affected by the placement of graduate engineers, tried their best to run down the latter as a class, sometimes working on the group feelings of the workers. Some of the supervisors who were not graduate engineers also spoke derisively of them as "the blue-eyed boys" of the organization. Management knew that many of the graduate engineers were not utilized according to their capacity or training, nor was any attempt made to test or develop their potentialities. They also knew that many of the graduate engineers were, therefore, dissatisfied with their work life. Some of them who did not get equal promotional opportunities as their colleagues placed in other departments, were looking for better jobs elsewhere.On the other hand, according to management, the young graduate engineers were themselves partly responsible for the hostile attitude of others in the organization. Some of them failed to appreciate that a newcomer invited hostility in the beginning and it took time before he was accepted as a member of the work-group. They did not realize that they would be fully productive only after gaining about five to seven years experience in the organization. A few thought that they belonged to a superior cadre and threw their weight around. They did not bother to understand and appreciate the problems of the rank-and-file of employees who worked under them.In spite of these drawback, the General Manager of the company felt that these men were a set of disciplined supervisors. They had a sense of pride in their profession, and with the extensive training they had received, they would be able to take up any responsible position in the organization in course of time.The General Manager could not allow the situation to continue especially when it was a difficult and costly process to recruit and train young engineering graduates of the requisite type and calibre. He knew that the prosperity of the company, to a large extent, depended on these young men. In addition, a large number of lucrative employment opportunities were available to these young engineers elsewhere and there was a systematic raid on them, He, therefore, called a meeting of all heads of departments to review the situation.Questions:1. Identify the issues related to manpower planning as evident in the case. 2. Discuss the strategies to tackle the percentage of internal promotion at the organizationalLevel3. What type of additional training programmes should be imparted for direct entrants? 4. Suppose you are the head of the personnel division. What would be your suggestions in the meeting which has been called by the General Manager?

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Famous Bookshop sells books to customers. The business owned by Mr. Previn. The following shows the list of transactions occurred in the month of April 2019. 1. Purchased 200 books from Wiluy on credit, each book cost RM10.00. Purchased 10 new book shelves with a total cost RM2,000 from Deco Enterprise on credit. Sold 50 books with a total RM1,000 to Clever School on credit. The business bought a new computer RM2,000 from Computer World Sdn Bhd. Mr Previn paid RM400 deposit by cash and the rest would be on credit. 2. 3. 4. Sold books to customers in cash RMS,000. Settled the amount owing to Wiluy and receiving RM200 discount. Mr Previn used cash on hand from the business to pay off his personal utility bill 5. 6. 7. that cost RM500. 8. Received RM50 interest from the term deposit, transferred into business bank account. 9. Transferred RM2,000 cash into business bank account. Received a cheque from Clever School for RM1,000 as full settlement. Paid monthly salary to Fattiha by cash RM1,000. 10. 11. Required: a) Prepare jourmal entries to record the above transactions. b) Prepare Bank account at April 2019. Part B On 1" August 2018, Mickey Company borrows RM100,000 from HRB Bank by signing a 6-month, 6%, interest-bearing note. Assuming year ended is 31" December 2018. Required: a) On what date does this note mature? b) How much interest expense results from this note in 2018? c) How much interest expense results from this note in 2019? d) Prepare journal entries to record (1) issuance of the note (2) accrual of interest at the end of December 2018, and (3) payment of the note at maturity.

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A Case Study on TERI Rewards Corporate Efforts The annual awards recognise the efforts of corporates in environmental management and sustainable initiatives In order to encourage environmental management and protection in the corporate sector, TERI instituted the Corporate Environmental Awards last year. Encouraged by the response and interest shown by corporates, TERI has decided to confer the awards annually. The objective of the awards is to recognise the leadership efforts of corporates in environmental management and sustainable initiatives, recognise innovative practices that promote sustainable development and further encourage and provide momentum to environmental initiatives. The awards are divided into three categories: Category 1: companies with a turnover of less than or equal to Rs 100 crore per annum; Category II: companies with a turnover of between Rs 100 crore and Rs 500 crore per annum; and Category III: companies with a turnover above or equal to Rs 500 crore per annum. The application fee for category I is Rs 500 per application; category II, Rs 2,000, and category III, Rs 5,000. Says R K Pachauri, director general, TERI, “The TERI Corporate Environmental Awards help corporates and Indian society in general in two major ways. Firstly, the awards recognise good practices and excellence in protecting the environment on the part of deserving corporate organisations. Secondly, the awards help to focus on the responsibility of business in protecting the environment and conserving our natural resources. Even those organisations that do not participate in the process will get to know about these awards and feel motivated to do their bit in the same cause. Overall, these awards will help to prepare businesses for the coming era when the corporate sector will have to face very stringent environmental standards to be imposed by the public at large and governments in particular. The bottomline of a company that prepares effectively for such a future will be healthier than that of one that does not.” Out of 110 applications received by TERI this year, 18 companies were shortlisted and the final awards will be given on June 17. The selection of the awards is based on a questionnaire filled by the company and a case study on the environmental initiative undertaken. After short listing the companies, experts from TERI visit the site to check on the authenticity of the environmental initiative. The case studies were evaluated on the basis of a few pre-set parameters, like pollution prevention—proactive practices, process improvements and modifications undertaken resulting in environmental improvement, waste reduction and energy or resource conservation. Scientific research and technological innovation—research or technological innovations that have been implemented or demonstrated for addressing environmental issues. Environmental benefits—success and effectiveness of the programme, both in terms of environmental and economic benefits. Potential model for business commitment—the replicability or transferability of the practices, outcomes or experience of the project. The jury members for selecting the awards are Justice J S Verma, former-chairperson, National Human Rights Commission and former chief justice of India; Vishwanath Anand, vice-chairperson, National Environment Appellate Authority; Suman K Bery, director-general, National Council of Applied Economic Research; Sanjaya Baru, chief editor, The Financial Express; and R K Pachauri, director general, TERI. In Category I, five companies were shortlisted: M K Electric; Chemfab Alakalis Ltd; Shriram Alkali and Chemicals; The Orchid—An Ecotel Hotel and Hitech Arai. In Category II, five companies were shortlisted: Andhra Paper Mills Ltd; Sanghi Spinners India Ltd; Shree Cements Ltd; Star Paper Mills Ltd and Samcor Glass Ltd. In Category III, eight cases were shortlisted: Orient Paper Mills; Grasim Industries Ltd; Bharat Petroleum Corp. Ltd; Hindustan Lever Ltd; Chennai Petroleum Corp. Ltd; Harihar Polyfibres; Hindalco Industries Ltd and Hero Honda Motors Ltd. How are the TERI Corporate Environmental Awards different from other similar awards? Mr Pachauri explains, “I am not aware of any other award dealing with environmental performance where such rigorous evaluation and objective scrutiny is carried out in determining the winner. Not only is the technical and economic evaluation of each entry carried out by a team of researchers from TERI, but the final decision is taken by a very eminent panel of judges chaired by a former chief justice of India. It is the result of the objectivity and rigour of the process that has given these awards the prominence they have attained in a short period of time. Another feature of the award, which is worth mentioning, is the subdivision of companies on the basis of turnover. Hence, the performance of a small unit is not evaluated against that of a large enterprise, which may have very different managerial and technological capabilities. The awards are differentiated on the basis of size of the enterprise.” Last year, TERI received some 89 entries; this year, it is 110. Mr Pachauri does not think the numbers are low. “Firstly, a jump of over 25 per cent in the entries received in merely a year is a very encouraging development, but the figure of 110 entries consists of very serious contenders. We accept entries only with a modest processing fee. This eliminates those who may not be serious and those who have only trivial achievements to claim. Besides, the process is made known to all potential contenders, who would be persuaded that this is a high calibre process of selection signified by the very choice of the judges who form the selection panel. Also, the companies are aware that any claims that they make in their entries will be carefully investigated by TERI researchers by site visits and on-the-spot evaluation for all shortlisted candidates. This helps further to eliminate doubtful claims and trivial entries.” Last year, the Phulpur plant of Indian Farmers Fertiliser Co-operative Ltd (IFFCO) won the first award in category III of TERI Corporate Environmental Awards for setting up effluent projects for not only recycling, but also for zero liquid discharge. Says C P Srivastava, joint general manager, Projects, IFFCO, “We feel proud to be awarded as it recognises our efforts to keep the environment clean.” Please answer the questions below based on the case study above: 1. What is the objective of the case? 2. Discuss the objective of rewards. 3. Discuss the 3 categories of awards mentioned in the case. 4. What is the another important feature of the award apart leadership from efforts mentioned in the case?

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Carefully read the following case and critically analyze it to answer the given questions at the end. Real Tape was a great company to work for in the 1960s. They were one of the premiere companies in the reel-to reel tape business. There was little competition on the West Coast, and had the region pretty much to themselves. When cassettes came in, they switched their product line but not the attitudes. They still did business the old way. But, the market had changed. There was competition from the Europeans, the Japanese, and from other Far East producers. These competitors were pricing products below their costs. They had also improved their quality, were delivering products on time, and were introducing new products such as high-bias chromium oxide tapes before Real Tape did. By the time, Real Tape woke up, it was too late. They discovered that they had lost touch with their customers. Many had left or were or were leaving them. Why did Real Tape not wake up earlier? There could be many reasons, but an important one was the lack of a good management accounting system. They thought of the accounting system as a necessary evil for external financial and tax reporting. As long as they were making money, no one cared. When they began to address the problems seriously, they found out that their accounting system had no information on many of the questions the management needed to know. The point is they mistook the profits they were showing on their external financial statements for profits they could sustain. Questions (a) What is (are) the major issue(s) of the case? Identify. [5] (b) How should the management accountant of the company approach the problem? [10]

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This question is designed to demonstrate the importance of project management. IT projects often fail in some way. Schedules overrun, budgets are exceeded and delivered systems don't do what users need. In most cases, this is because the project was not managed effectively, either by the client, the developers or both. This should take around 5 hours in total - we suggest 3 hours for the research and 2 hours to write a report. This question makes use of the Catalogue of Catastrophe page on the Calleam Consulting Ltd (formaerly the International Project Leadership Academy) website that you have already seen in Block 3 Part 1, Section 2.3, Activity 1.4. We have chosen this particular website because the projects listed in the report are reasonably well known and documented. This should give ease of access to resources that you can use to investigate each case. Although some of the reports were written several years ago, the lessons learned from these cases are still relevant to project management today On the '2015' section of the Catalogue of Catastrophe page, choose one of the following two IT projects: 3. Los Angeles Unified School District (https://calleam.com/ WTPF/ ?p=7626) 6. Ontario Provincial Government (https://calleam.com/ WTPF/ ?p=7597) Read the articles cited by the description of your chosen project and undertake some internet research to investigate the project further. Write a short report about the report which should contain the following elements. The name of the project and a brief description, including the main details and history of the project. Explain why you picked this project. Explain the form that the problems took. Problems can include: cost overrun delay cancellation failure to meet the users' needs other - describe the kind of problem and explain what form it took. If known, give the scale of the failure - for example size of cost overrun, length of delay, consequences for users. The possible reasons for the failure, either based on information from the sources you have researched or on your knowledge of project management. Your own conclusions including lessons learnt and recommendations for future projects of this sort. You should cite at least one other authoritative article in addition to those cited in the description of your chosen project. Insert a reference to the project report you have selected, the additional source you have found and any other materials you have consulted. Remember to produce explanations in your own words and to use quotation marks and citations to refer to any passages of cited material. Do not forget to include references to any such material at the end of the question. Write no more than 450 words for Question 6, including headings and citations but not references.

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You will use the provided financial statements for Starbucks. Take 2019 and 2020 information given and perform the required financial ratios listed below. Compare the ratios of 2019 and 2020 to each other. In comparing the ratios you will need to discuss which year has a better ratio, justify your rationale, and explain your findings in detail in your analysis. Part 1: 1) What is the ratio used for, what is its’ purpose? 2) Write out formula 3) Fill out formula using the two years financial statement information for both companies Part 2: For each of the four categories of ratios, identify what the four categories are, and in your own words, explain the following 1) Who are the main stakeholders? 2) What are they assessing? 3) Why are they assessing it? STARBUCKS CORPORATION CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF EARNINGS (in millions, except per share data) Sep 27, 2020 Sep 29. 2019 Sep 30, 2018 Eiscal Ycar. Endel Net revenues Company-operated stores Licensed stores 19,164.6 S 2,327.1 2,026.3 21,544.4 S 2,875.0 2,089.2 19,690.3 2,652.2 Other 2,377.0 24,719.5 Total net revenues 23,518.0 26,508.6 8,526.9 10,493.6 Product and distribution costs 7,694.9 7,930.7 Store operating expenses Other operating expenses Depreciation and amortization expenses General and administrative expenses Restructuring and impairments Total operating expenses Income from equity investees Operating income Gain resulting from acquisition of joint venture Net gain resulting from divestiture of certain operations Interest income and other, net Interest expense Earmings before income taxes 10,764.0 9,472.2 554.9 430.3 371.0 1431.3 1,3773 1,247.0 1,679.6 1,824.I 1,708.2 278.7 22,278.8 135.8 22,728.7 224.4 21,137.4 322.5 298.0 301.2 3,8833 1,376.4 499.2 191.4 1,561.7 4,077.9 622 8 39.7 96.5 (331.0) (437.0) 1,164.4 (170.3) 5.780.0 4,466.2 Income tax expense Net earnings including noncontrolling interests Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interests Net eamings attributable to Starbucks 239.7 871.6 1,262.0 924.7 3,594.6 4,518.0 (0.3) (36) (4.6) 928.3 3,599.2 4,518.3 Earmings per share- basic Eanings per share-diluted Weighted average shares outstanding Basic Diluted 0.79 2.95 S 3.27 0.79 S 2.92 S 324 1172.8 1,181.8 1,221.2 1,233.2 1,382.7 1,394.6

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“This new BatFly messaging service solves the public key distribution problem,” announces Watson cheerfully. “Suppose Alice wants to send a message m to Bob, but she’s not sure what public key Bob is using at the moment. Alice sends the message to the BatFly server, encrypted with the server’s public key to keep the message secret. Alice specifies that she wants to send the message to Bob, and signs the whole thing with her private key to prove that the message really is from her:A → S : A, Ea- [ B, Es+ [ m ] ]The BatFly server knows Bob’s up-to-date public key, and uses it to re-encrypt the message m. Then the server signs everything for integrity, and sends it back to Alice:S → A : S, Es- [ B, Eb+ [ m ] ]Now Alice sends this message on to Bob using whatever app she likes.The only public key that Alice has to know is the key for the server. And when Bob changes his public key, he only has to tell the BatFly server, not everyone else. The server never knows anybody else’s private key, and revocation is trivial!” Holmes has been examining the protocol closely. “Doesn’t anything worry you about the protocol at all, Watson?” he asks. “Well, now that you mention it,” replies Watson, “I’m a little uneasy about encrypting and then signing. I was thinking of recommending to them that it should be the other way round:A → S : B, Es+ [ A, Ea- [ m ] ]S → A : B, Eb+ [ S, Es- [ m ] ]What do you think, Holmes?” Holmes shakes his head. “I think that if I were Moriarty I’d be busing BatFly to revoke my public key right now,” he replies enigmatically. q1) Diagram for the given protocols q2) Suggest and discuss some ways that Moriarty might attack the Batfly server. Propose a revised version of the protocol and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of your revised version. State any assumptions carefully q3) What is the purpose of the Batfly server?

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1. Personal Loan Acceptance. Universal Bank is a relatively young bank growing rapidly in terms of overall customer acquisition. Universal bank wants to convert its liability customers (depositors) into personal loan customers (while retaining them as depositors). A campaign that the bank ran last year for liability customers showed a healthy conversion rate of over 9% success. This has encouraged the retail marketing department to devise smarter campaigns with better target marketing. The goal of our analysis is to model the previous campaign's customer behavior to analyze what combination of factors make a customer more likely to take out a personal loan. The file UniversalBank.xls contains data on 5,000 customers. The data include demographic information (age, income, etc.), the customer's relationship with the bank (mortgage, securities account, etc.), and the customer's response to the last personal loan campaign (variable = Personal Loan). Among the 5,000 customers, only 480 (9.6%) accepted the personal loan offer in the last campaign (textbook reference - 7.1). Partition the data into training (60%) and validation (40%) sets. a. Perform a k-NN classification with all input variables except ID and ZIP CODE using k =1. (Remember to transform categorical variables into binary dummy variables). Specify the success class as "1" (loan accepted), and use the default cutoff value of 0.5. How would the following new customer be classified using your model: Age=40, Experience=10, Income=84, Family-2, CCAvg-2, Education_1=0, Education_2=1, Education_3=0, Mortgage=0, Securities Account=0, CD Account=0, Online=1, and Credit Card=1? b. What is the choice of k that balances between overfitting and ignoring the predictor nformation? (Hint: Run k-NN for k values 1 to 10). C. Using the Confusion Matrix for the validation data in Part b, how many customers were classified correctly? How many customers were classified incorrectly? d. Classify the new customer using the best k. e. Repartition the data; this time into training, validation, and test sets (50%: 30% : 20%6). Apply the k-NN method with the k chosen above. Compare the Confusion Matrix of the test set with that of the training and validation sets. Comment on the differences and their reason. What is your assessment of the performance of this model?

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Scenario where the clouds can be applied Because of the breadth and depth of its offerings, AWS is the industry leader in IaaS. There are over 175 applications in the compute, storage, database, analytics, networking, mobile, developer tools, management tools, IoT, security, and enterprise applications categories [2]. As a result of the vendor's depth and breadth of services, AWS has a significant competitive advantage over its rivals. Microsoft Azure, on the other hand, is often used by C-level executives who have had a long relationship with the vendor and believe that the addition of the cloud computing component would help them improve service delivery. As a result, Microsoft Azure is regarded as a runner-up to Amazon Web Services. Whereas "Google also stands out for its deep expertise in open source technologies, particularly containers, thanks to its pivotal role in the development of Kubernetes for orchestration and the Istio service mesh, both of which are quickly becoming industry standard technologies [2]." As a result, according to Wang market analyst, GCP has increased industry competition. I would recommend AWS to a startup company looking to cut costs and increase agility because it has a varied breadth and depth of services that allow a startup to avoid costs associated with development warehouses in various locations. AWS is also the market leader, and its pricing is significantly lower than that of other cloud providers. The vendor is trustworthy and assists the startup in raising its profile on the world's largest online marketplace. It is also simple to use AWS and it brings together a variety of environments because it uses "a broad set of off-the-shelf machine learning services for use cases like image recognition (AWS Recognition), text to speech deep learning models (Polly), and the engine that powers Alexa (Lex) and also because it uses "a broad set of off-the-shelf machine learning services for use cases like image recognition (AWS Recognition), text to speech deep learning models (Polly), and the engine that powers AWS' main compute offering is its EC2 instances, which can be customized with a variety of options [2]. I would recommend Microsoft Azure to a businessperson who wants to create an online application for their company. This is because Azure machine learning allows "developers to write, test, and deploy algorithms, as well as access a marketplace for 21 | Page off-the-shelf APIS," according to Microsoft. Azure's compute also offers Virtual Machines (VMs) that come with additional tools like "Cloud Services and Resource Manager" to aid in the deployment of cloud-based applications, as well as its Azure Autoscaling service [2]. As a result, it provides developers with a secure platform that is both secure and cost-effective. In addition, in the case of app growth, I would also suggest using Google Cloud Platform, because virtual machines (VMs) ensure that it is "easy to boot, come with persistent disk storage, promise consistent performance, and are highly customizable depending on the customer's needs [2]."

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You have been selected to develop a GUIapplication called “My PC”. The application allows the user to complete the configuration of a computer system and produce a sales price for the system based on the configurationsselected. The application must meet the minimum operating requirements and specifications as provided below: Operation 1.The user configures the components of a computer system by selecting items from radio buttons, list boxes, buttons and check boxes. 2.When the user clicks the Calculate button, the application calculates the prices of the system by adding the cost of each selected component to the base price of the system. 3.An option is provided to the user to clear all entries and begin over. 4.When the user presses the “order” button, the program should display the current configuration in a dialog box of your choice. The dialog box should show the configuration the user is about to order with pricing and totals. 5.When the user presses the Exit button, the application exits. Specifications 1.You are free to use whatever layouts and panels you need to design the application. You can also create any classes you think might be helpful to solve and develop this application. 2.There are two base priced computers : A.Intel based priced system is $400 and includes the following configuration: •Intel Core i3 •Memory -4GB Dual Channel DDR3 1600MHz -1 DIMMs •125GB 7200RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive•Integrated Audio•Microsoft Windows 10 OS •2 Piece Powered Speaker Set •USB Wired Entry Keyboard •USB Optical Mouse B.AMD based priced system is $500 and includes the following configuration: •AMD Athlon II X2 255 for Desktops •4GB memory •125GB Hard Drive •Integrated 3D Graphics •Integrated Audio •Microsoft Windows 10 OS •2 Piece Powered Speaker Set •USB Wired Entry Keyboard •USB Optical Mouse Hints •Consider using separate classes to represent each of the system configuration options. Required Enhancements 1.Include sales tax at the rate of 0.065 in the final price. The sales tax should display separately of total and subtotal costing .2.Include combined shipping and handling rate of 0.015 based on the total cost in the total price. The shipping and handling should display separately of the total, subtotal and sales tax. 3. For the Intel systems, the user can select from 4 processors. Intel i5 4.00 GHz Add $75.00 Intel i5 4.20 GHz Add $100.00 Intel i7 4.40 GHz Add $150.00 Intel i7 4.80 GHz Add $200.00 4. For the AMD systems, the user can select from 4 processors. Athlon II X4 635 Add $35.00 Athlon II X4 945 Add $70.00 Phenom II X6 Add $165.00 Ryzen 7 1800x Add $300.00 5. For both systems, the user can select from 4 memory configurations. 6GB Add $15 8GB Add $20 12GB Add $80 16GB Add $150

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SECTION 2 Question 1 (35 points) Create a BPMN diagram of the following process. Use Pools and Lanes. Be sure to use proper grammar and syntax. Consider opportunities to use the tools you’ve just learned – including collapsed sub-processes, ad-hoc sub-processes, event-based gateways, and attached events. Hiring an Early Childhood Educator The hiring process at a daycare starts with the Daycare Director determining that there is a need. If the hiring need is due to a staffing shortfall, the Director moves forward with the process by posting an advertisement in the local newspaper. If the hiring need is above and beyond approved staffing levels, the Director must send to the Board of Directors a formal request to hire a new employee. The Board of Director will evaluate the request using an official process that we are not privy to. If the new hire request is approved, the Director places an advertisement in the local newspaper. If it is not approved, the Director may end the process or he/she may escalate the request and petition for an in- camera meeting with the board to plead his/her case. The in- camera meeting may result in a change of heart from the Board or it may not. Either way, this meeting proceeds with its own well-defined workflow that we will not be describing in detail for this process. Once an ad is placed in the local newspaper, the Director waits to receive applications. If no qualified applicants apply within the first week, the Director will post the advertisement in a national newspaper and with an online job posting site. If qualified applicants do apply within the first week, the Director contacts the qualified applicants and schedules an interview with each. The interview process is a standard "call" process that includes a series of questions and decisions that we will not detail in this workflow but we must note the existence of the process. In some cases, if the Director feels that it would be helpful, he/she may invite the Assistant Director to join in the interview process. Candidates that pass the interview process will be run through a series of background tests by HR. The tests include a police check, an education confirmation check, and a child registry check. In some instances the candidate will also be given a personality test to ensure that they will be a good fit for the team. Candidates that do not pass the tests will be notified that they have not been selected for the job. Candidates that do pass the test will be given a second interview that will be led by the Board of Directors. The Board of Director will make recommendations to the Director. The Director will review all recommendations and select their preferred hire. The Director will call the prospective hire and offer them the position. If the candidate accepts the offer, the Director confirms a start date, notifies HR of the new hire, sends a welcome letter to the candidate, and notifies the rest of the staff of the new hire. If the candidate does not accept the offer, the Director selects a new candidate and makes an offer to that candidate. Once a final hire

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Randy May is a 32-year-old airplane mechanic for a small airline based on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts. Recently, Randy won $2 million in the New England lottery. Because Randy is relatively young, he decided to invest his winnings in a business to create a future stream of page 588 earnings. After weighing many investment options, Randy chose to open up a chain of ice cream shops in the Cape Cod area. (As it turns out, Cape Cod and the nearby islands are short of ice cream shops.) Randy reviewed his budget and figured he had enough cash to open shops on each of the two islands (Nantucket and Martha's Vineyard) and two shops in small towns on the Cape (Falmouth and Buzzards Bay). Randy contracted with a local builder, and the construction/renovation of the four shops is well under way. The task that is occupying Randy's attention now is how to staff the shops. Two weeks ago, he placed advertisements in three area newspapers. So far, he has received 100 applications. Randy has done some informal HR planning and figures he needs to hire 50 employees to staff the four shops. Being a novice at this, Randy is unsure how to select the 50 people he needs to hire. Randy consulted his friend Mary, who owns the lunch counter at the airport. Mary told Randy that she used interviews to get "the most knowledgeable people possible" and recommended it to Randy because her people had "generally worked out well." While Randy greatly respected Mary's advice, on reflection some questions came to mind. Does Mary's use of the interview mean that it meets Randy's requirements? How can Randy determine whether his chosen method of selecting employees is effective or ineffective? Confused, Randy also sought the advice of Professor Ray Higgins, from whom Randy took an HR management course while getting his business degree. After learning of the situation and offering his consulting services, Professor Higgins suggested that Randy choose one of two selection methods (after paying Professor Higgins's consulting fees, he cannot afford

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