Differences in flower color, shape, or fragrance are listed as being potential biological reproductive barriers. Do you

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Differences in flower color, shape, or fragrance are listed as being potential biological reproductive barriers. Do you think they would matter at all in a wind pollinated species? If a plant species has several flower colors (for example, red, white, and pink), could a mutation in the plant’s pollinator—but not in the plant species itself—be a biological reproductive barrier? For example, a mutation that makes it unable to see red?

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