Liquid drops are generally nonspherical when formed (e.g., upon release from a pipette), and if they are

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Liquid drops are generally nonspherical when formed (e.g., upon release from a pipette), and if they are in a certain size range their shape oscillates in time. It is desired to predict the period to of the oscillations.

(a) Assuming that to depends only on the surface tension γ, the liquid density ρ, and the linear dimension R (the radius of a sphere of equal volume), what can you conclude from dimensional analysis?

(b) Implicit in part (a) is that inertia and surface tension are important, but the oscillations are unaffected by viscosity or gravity. Estimate the range of R for which that will be true for a water drop.

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