If deep-sea divers rise to the surface too quickly, nitrogen bubbles in their blood can expand and prove fatal. This phenomenon is known as the bends. If a scuba diver rises quickly from a depth of 25 m in Lake Michigan (which is fresh water), what will be the volume at the surface of an N 2 bubble that occupied

Chapter 18, Exerise Questions #86

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If deep-sea divers rise to the surface too quickly, nitrogen bubbles in their blood can expand and prove fatal. This phenomenon is known as the bends. If a scuba diver rises quickly from a depth of 25 m in Lake Michigan (which is fresh water), what will be the volume at the surface of an N2 bubble that occupied 1.0 mm3 in his blood at the lower depth? Does it seem that this difference is large enough to be a problem? (Assume that the pressure difference is due only to the changing water pressure, not to any temperature difference, an assumption that is reasonable, since we are warm-blooded creatures.)

Related Book For answer-question

University Physics with Modern Physics

13th edition

Authors: Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman, A. Lewis Ford

ISBN: 978-0321696861