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Q:

Sales Less variable expenses Manufacturing Selling and administrative Tocal Contribution mergin Loss direct fixed expenses Net Income (less) Textbook Professional Company Division Division $120,000 19.200 6,000 25.200 94.800 12.000 $82,800 Management is concerned about the Professional Division and requests additional analysis, Additional information regarding May operations of the Professional Division is as follows: Sales Variable manufacturing expenses as a percentage of sales Other variable expenses as a percentage of sales Direct fixed expenses Allocated common fixed expenses Sales Variable manufacturing Manufacturing margin Cther variable expenses Safes Variable manufacturing expenses as a percentage of sales Other variable expenses as a percentage of sales Direct fixed expenses Allocated common fixed expenses Required Contribution margin Total direct costs: Direct fixed expenses Allocated common the expense Total Procuct margin Unallocated common fued expenses Professional division income toss! Total $246,000 $956,000 The professional accounting books are sold to auditors and controllers. The current information on these markets is as follows: Sales Variable manufacturing 123.000 142 200 18.300 12,300 135.300 150,500 110.700 205.500 120.000 132,000 (300) $73.500 Accounting Books Segment Manufacturing margin Other variable expenses 5 Contribution margin Direct fixed expenses Market margin Allocated common fixed expenses Market income (los) Inallocated common thred expenses Accounting market Income (los) Business Books Publishers Inc. Professional Division: Segment and Divisional Income Statements For the Month of May Accounting 84.000 1 5 50.400 33.000 ✓ 4,200 29.400 3 a. Prepare an Income statement segmented by product for the Professional Division, Include a column for the division as a whole. Note: Do not use a negative sign with your answers with the exception of a negative product margin or a division loss which should have a negative sign. 5 30,000 ✓ 2.400 32.400 ✓ 13.000) $ Professional Division Accounting Executive Management Books Books Segment Segment 584,000 Books Segment $84.000 60% 40% 376 3% 595 $30,000 $2,400 7.200✔ 900✔ 6,300 9.000✔ (2.700)✓ 900✓ 0x5 Accounting Books Segment Auditors Market Controllers Market Total $66.000 $84.000 $18.000 $44,090 $1.200 Executive 84,000 33.600 30.400✓ 4,200✓ 46.200 Business Books Publishers Inc. Professional Division Market Income Statements: Accounting Books Segment For the Month of May of May Auditors Market Controllers Market $18,0001 66,000$ 10.800 39.600✔ 26.400✔ 3.300 ✓ 23,100✔ 10.000 5.100 $9.000 $900 44,080✔ 1.200 ✓ 45.200 920 ✓ 00% 676 Auditors Market Discontinue in the short run ✔ Controllers Market Keep in the short run # ✔ 39.000✔ 39.000 3,000 35.100 b. Prepare an income statement segmented by market for the Accounting Books Segment of the Professional Division. Note: Do not use a negative sign with your answers with the exception of a negative market margin, a market loss, or an accounting market loss which should have a negative sign. 30,000 ✓ 3,600 33.600 ✓ 1,500 1,200 ✓ 0x $78,000 50% 591 Management Professional Division 5 75,000 $ 246,000✔ $30,000 $3.500 $ 5 $10.000 $27.000 $1.200 $2.100 29,400 27.000 60% 676 Total 84,000 ✓ 50,400 23.600✔ 4,200 2.400✓ 2,100 x DXI 0x 0x 123.000 123.000 ✓ 12,300 ✓ 110700 104,080 ✓ 7.200 111.290 (580) ÜX * c. Evaluate which Accounting Books Segment the Professional Division should keep or discontinue in the short run

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On January 1st, 2022, Mr. Pane starts Pane in the Glass Window Company by issuing 1,000 shares of $4 par common stock for $100 per share. The same day, the company purchased a delivery truck in exchange for signing a 5-year, 6% annual interest rate note payable with a face value of $50000. Interest is payable on the last day of every calendar year. The truck is valued at $50000 and has an estimated useful life of 10 years. On January 2nd the company purchased 510 windows from the manufacturer for $200 each and paid in cash. On January 3rd the window manufacturer contacted Pane in the Glass and offered an additional 60 windows for $180 each. During 2022, the company sold 320 windows on account for $360 each. The company uses LIFO inventory valuation and warranties its windows for 2 years. It expects that 10% of the windows will have a problem and that on average each window would cost $90 to fix. The company records bad debt expenses equal to 5% of credit sales. The company collects $92160 cash from credit sales. The company also learns Big Al who purchased 2 of the windows has declared bankruptcy and will not pay for his windows so Mr. Pane decides to write off the accounts receivable related to these two windows. On November 1st Lovers' Lanes, Bowling Alley requests that 19 of their new windows be repaired. The repairs were covered under warranty and the repairs cost $75 for each window. On the last day of the year Pane in the Glass pays interest on the note payable, and records depreciation expense using double declining balance depreciation. Requirements a. Make journal entries and adjusting entries b.Post journal entries to T accounts c. Make adjusted trial balance (test if it balances) d.Make income statement e.Statement of retained earnings f. Make balance sheet Answer the following questions: 1.Net Income 2. Gross Margin 3. Cash 4. Total assets 5. Cash from operations

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Seller Brokerage has listed a Single-Family home in South Gate with Mr. Seller. The Property was placed on the Market and received an offer. The offer was submitted on behalf of Mrs. Buyer by Buyer Brokerage and Mr. Seller accepted the terms. Although the documents presented do not display electronic signatures, assume these documents were fully executed via electronic signatures. Escrow has been opened on this transaction which is currently in process. The Escrow Officer has received the RPA-CA and is asking you to translate the information into the Escrow Memo Spreadsheet so Escrow and Commission Instructions can be generated. The key documents for the Offer and Memo are presented for your review. Additional information not on the RPA-CA you will need for the Memo sheet: 1. Seller does not have a mortgage lien on the property at this time. The house is "free and clear" as the mortgage has been paid off years ago. Therefore, there is no Seller proration for Mortgage Interest. 2. Hint: Buyer's Loan information is on the RPA-CA section 3D. 3. The Listing with the Seller was agreed in writing on the Residential Listing Agreement that the Listing Broker would get 3% commission and the Selling (Buyer) Broker would get 2% commission. (FYI, The MLS listing advertised that the Cooperating Broker would get 2% commission) This makes the total commission charged to the Seller at 5%. 4. The Property Tax annual amount due by the Seller is $1,076.34. The Seller has already paid the first half of the annual Tax bill which covers from July 1, 2018 thru December 31, 2018. The second half payment of $538.17 has not been paid by the Seller and covers the time period from January 1, 2019 thru June 30, 2019. ( You will need to calculate the day of Escrow closing, and from that day, count how many calendar days the Seller will have owned the property since Jan 1st. The number of days must be multiplied by the daily prorated amount) ( Hint. Daily Proration dollar amount of property taxes are calculated based on a 30-day month per California Escrow Practice so 6 months equals 180 days). ( Extra hint , you are calculating both the Daily Proration dollar amount and the number of calendar days Seller would be responsible for the prorated second half Tax payment) 5. The Seller will handle the cancelation of their Fire Insurance policy outside of Escrow. 6. The Lender will later on in the Escrow timeline provide information via a document called the Lending Estimate- LE (used to be called the Good Faith Estimate) regarding Buyer's closing costs, so they are not available yet at this time, meaning you do not have to estimate for this exercise any Buyer Prorations on this form. 7. The Documentary Transfer Tax is equal to $1.10 for every $1,000 of the purchase price. 8. The Cost for an NHD report typically varies between $90-$120 based on which Vendor provides the report. For this Escrow, the chosen Vendor charges $94.95.

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Current assets: Cash and cash equivalents Short-term investments Accounts receivable, net Inventories Long-term investments Equity investments Property, plant and equipment, net Operating lease, right-of-use asset Deferred income taxes, net Other long-term assets Other intangible assets Prepaid expenses and other current assets Total current assets Goodwill TOTAL ASSETS Current liabilities: ASSETS LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY/(DEFICIT) STARBUCKS CORPORATION CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS (in millions, except per share data) Accounts payable Accrued liabilities Accrued payroll and benefits Income taxes payable Current portion of operating lease liability Stored value card liability and current portion of deferred revenue Short-term debt Current portion of long-term debt Total current liabilities Long-term debt Operating lease liability Deferred revenue Other long-term liabilities Total liabilities Shareholders' deficit: Common stock ($0.001 par value)-authorized, 2,400.0 shares; issued and outstanding, 1,180.0 and 1,173.3 shares, respectively Additional paid-in capital Retained deficit Accumulated other comprehensive income/(loss) Total shareholders' deficit Noncontrolling interests Total deficit TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY/(DEFICIT) 43 Starbucks Corporation 2021 Form 10-K S S See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements. Oct 3, 2021 6,455.7 S 162.2 940.0 1,603.9 594.6 9,756.4 281.7 268.5 6,369.5 8,236.0 1,874.8 578.5 349.9 3,677.3 31,392.6 1,211.6 S 1,973.2 772.3 348.0 1,251.3 1,596.1 998.9 8,151.4 13,616.9 7,738.0 6,463.0 737.8 36,707.1 1.2 846.1 (6,315.7) 147.2 (5,321.2) 6.7 (5,314.5) 31,392.6 Sep 27, 2020 4,350.9 281.2 883.4 1,551.4 739.5 7,806.4 206.1 478.7 6,241.4 8,134.1 1,789.9 568.6 552.1 3,597.2 29,374.5 997.9 1,160.7 696.0 98.2 1,248.8 1,456.5 438.8 1,249.9 7,346.8 14,659.6 7,661.7 6,598.5 907.3 37,173.9 1.2 373.9 (7,815.6) (364.6) (7,805.1) 5.7 (7,799.4) 29,374.5

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True or False: Terrorism, or acts of violence by non-state actors, is distinguished from criminal acts on the basis of the purpose for which violence is carried out. In the case of terrorism, the purpose is making political changes. According to a cultural explanation of terrorism, in an attempt to preserve their threatened identity and values, groups actively distinguish themselves from despised “others.” At the local level, the cultural friction may translate into conflicts divided along religious or ethnic lines that aim to safeguard identity. Globalization has been an effective deterrent against terrorism. The processes of globalization prevent terrorist organizations from acquiring, manufacturing, and using weapons of mass destruction. Liberal perspectives in the international political economy (IPE) contends that the global political economy is being shaped by competition among states, who seek to maximize their power and security. Maintenance of fiscal discipline, trade liberalization, deregulation of the economy, etc. are examples of the set of policy prescriptions of the Washington Consensus promoted by the United States in developing countries. The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) was transformed into the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in 1995. The IMF is responsible for managing international trade. The most favored nation principle has been a bedrock of international trade negotiations. The principle holds that any preferential trading agreement reached with one country should be extended to other countries. The theory of comparative advantage argues that all countries stand to benefit by specializing in the production of goods to which they are relatively most suited and then trading their surplus production with one another. In an attrition strategy (of terrorism), Terrorists try to convince the population that the terrorists are strong enough to punish disobedience and that the government is too weak to stop them, so that people behave as the terrorists wish. Groups engaged in outbidding (a strategy of terrorism) use violence to convince the public that the terrorists have greater resolve to fight the enemy than rival groups, and therefore are worthy of support. A spoiler strategy of terrorism is an attempt to induce the enemy to respond to terrorism with indiscriminate violence, which radicalizes the population and moves them to support the terrorists. Terrorists sometimes resort to hostage taking, airline hijacking, and explosions announced in advance are generally intended to use the possibility of harm to bring issues to the attention of the target audience. These actions are referred to as demonstrative terrorism.

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Question NOTE : The work you do on this question should be included in your Project Management Portfolio. This is the last component of the Project Management Portfolio This activity concludes your Project Management knowledge by looking at how projects are closed. Throughout each phase, lessons are learned and opportunities for improvement are discovered. In order to continuously improve the success of projects, documenting the lessons learned helps a project team to identify the causes of problems that occurred and avoid them in later projects. The objective of a Lessons Learned Report is to collect all the relevant information. Look at the lecture slides from Topic 6 to refresh your memory. Write a Lessons Learned Report for a project you have worked on. This project could be: An assignment you have done for this unit An assignment you have done for any other unit Any project you are able to report on. Your Lessons Learned Report should include the following sections: Introduction Briefly describe the project. Achievement of scope and time constraints Discuss whether the project met scope and time constraints. That is, were you able to do everything that was planned, and finish/submit on time? What went right? Describe one example of what went right on this project. What went wrong? Describe one example of what went wrong on this project. Lessons learned Briefly discuss what the main lessons you learned from this project were. This should include both in terms of managing the project, and in terms of skills that may be useful to you in the future. Implications for the Poster Presentation project Discuss what you will you do differently on the Poster Presentation project based on your experiences with this and other projects.

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Fun & Games Corporation ( Fun & Games or the Company ) is a local toy store that sells all types of children’s toys and is based in Alexandria, Virginia. The Company has been in business since 1950 with multiple locations in the DC area. The Company has continued to grow and has beat its revenue projections for the past few years. Scenario You are a Partner at Knox LLP ( Knox ), a boutique forensic accounting firm located in Washington, D.C. On 30/1/2020 you received a call from your long-time friend Howard Green, the chief legal officer at the Company, requesting a meeting with you during the month of February 2020, regarding an alleged fraud scheme committed by Carla Cosgrove, an employee at Fun & Games. During the meeting, you learned the following facts: Overview of the Allegation: 1. Two weeks ago, Harold Lewis, CFO of the Company, received a phone call from the Company’s bank explaining a check drawn on its operating account had been flagged as potentially fraudulent and an employee of the Company had presented the check for deposit. 2. The check in question was for $50,000.25 and had been issued to one of Fun & Games’ largest vendors, Buddy the Elf Toy Store. Company Structure: 1. Fun & Games has multiple departments based on toy type. The departments are as follows: a. Games b. Building Sets & Blocks c. Action Figures d. Dolls e. Stuffed Animals f. Pretend Play & Dress-Up g. Outdoor Play 2. Each department furthers breaks down costs based on a cost center or a specific category within the department. 3. The specific cost center codes and titles for the Games department are as follows: a. G101 - Card games b. G102 - Board games c. G103 - Puzzles d. G104 - Electronic & interactive games e. G105 - Magic f. G106 - Travel games & novelties g. G107 - Game Rooms h. G108 - Marketing i. G109 - Taxes j. G110 – Telephone k. G111 – Internet l. G112 – Electric m. G113 – Office Supplies Initial Investigation/Background Facts: After receiving a phone call from its bank, the Company performed an initial investigation and uncovered the following facts: 1. Buddy the Elf Toy Store is a legitimate vendor of Fun & Games and the check in question was a quarterly payment due on Invoice Number 78320 as part of the Company’s recently updated contract with Buddy the Elf Toy Store. 2. The invoice in question was retrieved from the Accounts Payable ( AP ) department and had been approved and submitted for payment by Carla Cosgrove of the Games department. 3. Carla had requested that the check for Buddy the Elf Toy Store should be returned to her by the AP department once it was issued and she would mail it to the vendor. 4. The Company contacted Buddy the Elf Toy Store and Buddy the Elf Toy Store confirmed that all other invoices paid to Buddy the Elf Toy Store were legitimate and the funds had been received. 5. The investigation involved discussions with Buddy the Elf Toy Store and the Company’s Accounts Payable department. During the internal discussions it was discovered that Carla often didn’t follow procedures. 6. After finding out that Carla didn’t adhere to procedures, the Company sent her home to complete their investigation without her present. 7. The Company suspect that Carla Cosgrove was acting fraudulently and terminated her from the Company. At the time of her termination her annual salary was $50,000. 8. Carla Cosgrove joined the Company in 2015 and has always been a budget director in the Games department of the Company. 9. Carla’s regular duties included overseeing the budget process for each of the cost centers within the department and working with the Company’s Chief Budget Director to integrate the Games department budget within the overall budget for the Company, attending quarterly budget meetings and attending the yearly budget presentations to Company management for approval. 10. In approximately 2016, Carla had been delegated additional responsibilities from the head of the Games department, Harvey Peacock, to include approving and processing vendor payments and employee expense reimbursements. 11. Carla was a well-liked employee and had made friends with a number of the staff in the AP department. 12. The Company learned a number of items about Carla from the initial interviews conducted with employees, including the following: a. Carla was an avid traveler and had taken numerous trips in the past few years to the Caribbean. b. Carla and her husband had recently built a large home in Kensington, MD. c. Carla drove a Lexus SUV with a license plate that read Flowers. d. Carla had lots of expensive looking jewelry and designer hand bags, which employees had assumed were fake. 13. The Company learned Carla had purchased a floral business in approximately 2018 called Flower Patch Incorporated. Preliminary internet searches listed the address of the business at 732 Independence Way, Kensington, MD. 14. A meeting with AP supervisor have conducted and she provided the following information about payable process : a. The Company’s Fiscal Year start at July 1 and end in June 30. b. The Company processes all vendor payments on a weekly basis on Thursday. To have a vendor paid that week, the invoice must be received by AP by Tuesday at noon. c. The invoice must contain the signature of the authorized signor for each department to process the invoice. The authorized signor is by default the head of each department; however, the authority can be delegated. If signatory authority is delegated, the name of the delegate must be provided to the AP department. d. The invoice must also contain a cost center code for it to be appropriately allocated in the system for budget and expense purposes. e. The invoices are entered into the system and reviewed against the batch sheet by the Controller for accuracy. Once the Controller signs-off, the checks are issued on Friday morning and mailed by the AP department the same day. f. The Company allows departments to request a check be returned to the requestor and Mailed. This is not a common occurrence but happens on rare occasions when the department wants to include correspondence or something else with the payment. 15. There instruction have been received through email from Carla Cosgrove (Appendix A in Blackboard) Engagement: After the preliminary meetings are concluded, you meet again with Howard and he tells you the Company is concerned that Carla had submitted other fictitious invoices. Therefore, you are being asked to perform a forensic investigation and prepare a report and present your findings to the CFO Required: 1. Form into group of 5 - 6 students. 2. Use the information provided in the case above and the Excel file Fun and Game AP Data to perform investigation. Find the excel file in blackboard (Assignment folder). 3. Write a forensic report that answer the questions below: (A template of the report provided below ) (25 marks) a. Identify and explain any red flags that you uncovered during your investigation? b. If you identified any potentially fraudulent vendor(s), which vendor(s) are they? c. Calculate the amount identified as potentially fraudulent in the Games Department AP Data provided? d. What are the types of fraud that have been committed in this case e. Describe the perceived opportunities that existed (Fraud Triangle) and how the fraud could have been perpetrated and covered up. f. What controls could be implemented to help prevent other potential fraudulent activity from occurring in the future?

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In Exercise, use Table II to obtain the required z-scores. Illustrate your work with graphs. 6.71 Obtain the z-score for which the area under the standard normal curve to its left is 0.025. Obtain the z-score for which the area under the standard normal curve to its left is 0.025. Table II TABLE II Areas under the standard normal curve A 0.09 0.08 0.07 Second decimal place in z 0.06 0.05 0.04 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.00 0.0000 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0006 0.0006 0.0006 0.0006 0.0006 0.0007 0.0007 -3.2 0.0007 0.0007 0.0008 0.0008 0.0008 0.0008 0.0009 0.0009 0.0009 0.0010 -3.1 0.0010 0.0010 0.0011 0.0011 00011 0.0012 0.0012 0.0013 0.0013 0.0013. -3.0 -3.4 -3.3 0.0014 0.0014 0.0015 0.0015 0.0016 0.0016 0.0017 0.0018 0.0018 0.0019 0.0019 0.0020 0.0021 0.0021 0.0022 0.0023 0.0023 0.0024 0.0025 0.0026 0.0026 0.0027 0.0028 0.0029 0.0030 0.0031 0.0032 0.0033 0.0034 0.0035 0.0036 0.0037 0.0038 0.0039 0.0040 0.0041 0.0043 0.0044 0.0045 0.0047 0.0048 0.0049 0.0051 0.0052 0.0054 0.0055 0.0057 0.0059 0.0060 0.0062 0.0064 0.0066 0.0068 0.0069 0.0071 0.0073 0.0075 0.0078 0.0080 0.0082 0.0084 0.0087 0.0089 0.0091 0.0094 0.0096 0.0099 0.0102 0.0104 0.0107 0.0110 00113 0.0116 0.0119 0.0122 0.0125 0.0129 0.0132 0.0136 0.0139 0.0143 0.0146 0.0150 0.0154 0.0158 0.0162 0.0166 0.0170 0.0174 0.0179 0.0183 0.0188 0.0192 0.0197 0.0202 0.0207 0.0212 0.0217 0.0222 0.0228 0.0233 0.0239 0.0244 0.0250 0.0256 0.0262 0.0268 0.0274 0.0281 0.0287 0.0294 0.0301 0.0307 0.0314 0.0322 0.0329 0.0336 0.0344 0.0351 0.0359 0.0367 0.0375 0.0384 0.0392 0.0401 0.0409 0.0418 0.0427 0.0436 0.0446 0.0455 0.0465 0.0475 0.0485 0.0495 0.0505 0.0516 0.0526 0.0537 0.0548 0.0559 0.0571 0.0582 0.0594 0.0606 0.0618 0.0630 0.0643 0.0655 0.0668 0.0681 0.0694 0.0708 0.0721 0.0735 0.0749 0.0764 0.0778 0.0793 0.0808 0.0823 0.0838 0.0853 0.0869 0.0885 0.0901 0.0918 0.0934 0.0951 0.0968 0.0985 0.1003 0.1020 0.1038 0.1056 0.1075 0.1093 0.1112 0.1131 0.1151 0.1170 0.1190 0.1210 0.1230 0.1251 0.1271 0.1292 0.1314 0.1335 0.1357 0.1379 0.1401 0.1423 0.1446 0.1469 0.1492 0.1515 0.1539 0.1562 0.1587 0.1611 0.1635 0.1660 0.1685 0.1711 0.1736 0.1762 0.1788 0.1814 0.1841 0.1867 0.1894 0.1922 0.1949 0.1977 0.2005 0.2033 0.2061 0.2090 0.2119. 0.2148 0.2177 0.2206 0.2236 0.2266 0.2296 0.2327 0.2358 0.2389 0.2420 0.2451 0.2483 0.2514 0.2546 0.2578 0.2611 0.2643 0.2676 0.2709 0.2743 0.2776 0.2810 0.2843 0.2877 0.2912 0.2946 0.2981 0.3015 0.3050 0.3085 0.3121 0.3156 0.3192 0.3228 0.3264 0.3300 0.3336 0.3372 0.3409 0.3446 0.3483 0.3520 0.3557 0.3594 0.3632 0.3669 0.3707 0.3745 0.3783 0.3821 0.3859 0.3897 0.3936 03974 0.4013 04052 0.4090 0.4129 0.4168 0.4207 0.4247 0.4286 0.4325 04364 0.4404 0.4443 0.4483 0.4522 0.4562 0.4602 0.4641 0.4681 0.4721 04761 0.4801 04840 0.4880 0.4920 0.4960 0.5000 -3.9 -3.8 -3.7 For 2-3.90, the areas are 0.0000 to four decimal places. -3.6 -35 -2.9 -2.8 -2.7 -2.6 -25 -2.3 -2.2 -2.1 -2.0 -1.9 -1.8 -1.7 -1.6 -15 -1.4 -1.3 -1.2 -1.1 -1.0 -0.9 -0.8 -0.7 -0.6 -05 -0.4 -0.3 -0.2 -0.1 -0.0

Q:

In Exercise, use Table II to obtain the required z-scores. Illustrate your work with graphs. 6.71 Obtain the z-score for which the area under the standard normal curve to its left is 0.025. Obtain the z-score that has area 0.70 to its right. Table II TABLE II Areas under the standard normal curve A 0.09 0.08 0.07 Second decimal place in z 0.06 0.05 0.04 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.00 0.0000 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0006 0.0006 0.0006 0.0006 0.0006 0.0007 0.0007 -3.2 0.0007 0.0007 0.0008 0.0008 0.0008 0.0008 0.0009 0.0009 0.0009 0.0010 -3.1 0.0010 0.0010 0.0011 0.0011 00011 0.0012 0.0012 0.0013 0.0013 0.0013. -3.0 -3.4 -3.3 0.0014 0.0014 0.0015 0.0015 0.0016 0.0016 0.0017 0.0018 0.0018 0.0019 0.0019 0.0020 0.0021 0.0021 0.0022 0.0023 0.0023 0.0024 0.0025 0.0026 0.0026 0.0027 0.0028 0.0029 0.0030 0.0031 0.0032 0.0033 0.0034 0.0035 0.0036 0.0037 0.0038 0.0039 0.0040 0.0041 0.0043 0.0044 0.0045 0.0047 0.0048 0.0049 0.0051 0.0052 0.0054 0.0055 0.0057 0.0059 0.0060 0.0062 0.0064 0.0066 0.0068 0.0069 0.0071 0.0073 0.0075 0.0078 0.0080 0.0082 0.0084 0.0087 0.0089 0.0091 0.0094 0.0096 0.0099 0.0102 0.0104 0.0107 0.0110 00113 0.0116 0.0119 0.0122 0.0125 0.0129 0.0132 0.0136 0.0139 0.0143 0.0146 0.0150 0.0154 0.0158 0.0162 0.0166 0.0170 0.0174 0.0179 0.0183 0.0188 0.0192 0.0197 0.0202 0.0207 0.0212 0.0217 0.0222 0.0228 0.0233 0.0239 0.0244 0.0250 0.0256 0.0262 0.0268 0.0274 0.0281 0.0287 0.0294 0.0301 0.0307 0.0314 0.0322 0.0329 0.0336 0.0344 0.0351 0.0359 0.0367 0.0375 0.0384 0.0392 0.0401 0.0409 0.0418 0.0427 0.0436 0.0446 0.0455 0.0465 0.0475 0.0485 0.0495 0.0505 0.0516 0.0526 0.0537 0.0548 0.0559 0.0571 0.0582 0.0594 0.0606 0.0618 0.0630 0.0643 0.0655 0.0668 0.0681 0.0694 0.0708 0.0721 0.0735 0.0749 0.0764 0.0778 0.0793 0.0808 0.0823 0.0838 0.0853 0.0869 0.0885 0.0901 0.0918 0.0934 0.0951 0.0968 0.0985 0.1003 0.1020 0.1038 0.1056 0.1075 0.1093 0.1112 0.1131 0.1151 0.1170 0.1190 0.1210 0.1230 0.1251 0.1271 0.1292 0.1314 0.1335 0.1357 0.1379 0.1401 0.1423 0.1446 0.1469 0.1492 0.1515 0.1539 0.1562 0.1587 0.1611 0.1635 0.1660 0.1685 0.1711 0.1736 0.1762 0.1788 0.1814 0.1841 0.1867 0.1894 0.1922 0.1949 0.1977 0.2005 0.2033 0.2061 0.2090 0.2119. 0.2148 0.2177 0.2206 0.2236 0.2266 0.2296 0.2327 0.2358 0.2389 0.2420 0.2451 0.2483 0.2514 0.2546 0.2578 0.2611 0.2643 0.2676 0.2709 0.2743 0.2776 0.2810 0.2843 0.2877 0.2912 0.2946 0.2981 0.3015 0.3050 0.3085 0.3121 0.3156 0.3192 0.3228 0.3264 0.3300 0.3336 0.3372 0.3409 0.3446 0.3483 0.3520 0.3557 0.3594 0.3632 0.3669 0.3707 0.3745 0.3783 0.3821 0.3859 0.3897 0.3936 03974 0.4013 04052 0.4090 0.4129 0.4168 0.4207 0.4247 0.4286 0.4325 04364 0.4404 0.4443 0.4483 0.4522 0.4562 0.4602 0.4641 0.4681 0.4721 04761 0.4801 04840 0.4880 0.4920 0.4960 0.5000 -3.9 -3.8 -3.7 For 2-3.90, the areas are 0.0000 to four decimal places. -3.6 -35 -2.9 -2.8 -2.7 -2.6 -25 -2.3 -2.2 -2.1 -2.0 -1.9 -1.8 -1.7 -1.6 -15 -1.4 -1.3 -1.2 -1.1 -1.0 -0.9 -0.8 -0.7 -0.6 -05 -0.4 -0.3 -0.2 -0.1 -0.0

Q:

In Exercise, use Table II to obtain the required z-scores. Illustrate your work with graphs. 6.71 Obtain the z-score for which the area under the standard normal curve to its left is 0.025. Determine z0.015. Table II TABLE II Areas under the standard normal curve A 0.09 0.08 0.07 Second decimal place in z 0.06 0.05 0.04 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.00 0.0000 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0006 0.0006 0.0006 0.0006 0.0006 0.0007 0.0007 -3.2 0.0007 0.0007 0.0008 0.0008 0.0008 0.0008 0.0009 0.0009 0.0009 0.0010 -3.1 0.0010 0.0010 0.0011 0.0011 00011 0.0012 0.0012 0.0013 0.0013 0.0013. -3.0 -3.4 -3.3 0.0014 0.0014 0.0015 0.0015 0.0016 0.0016 0.0017 0.0018 0.0018 0.0019 0.0019 0.0020 0.0021 0.0021 0.0022 0.0023 0.0023 0.0024 0.0025 0.0026 0.0026 0.0027 0.0028 0.0029 0.0030 0.0031 0.0032 0.0033 0.0034 0.0035 0.0036 0.0037 0.0038 0.0039 0.0040 0.0041 0.0043 0.0044 0.0045 0.0047 0.0048 0.0049 0.0051 0.0052 0.0054 0.0055 0.0057 0.0059 0.0060 0.0062 0.0064 0.0066 0.0068 0.0069 0.0071 0.0073 0.0075 0.0078 0.0080 0.0082 0.0084 0.0087 0.0089 0.0091 0.0094 0.0096 0.0099 0.0102 0.0104 0.0107 0.0110 00113 0.0116 0.0119 0.0122 0.0125 0.0129 0.0132 0.0136 0.0139 0.0143 0.0146 0.0150 0.0154 0.0158 0.0162 0.0166 0.0170 0.0174 0.0179 0.0183 0.0188 0.0192 0.0197 0.0202 0.0207 0.0212 0.0217 0.0222 0.0228 0.0233 0.0239 0.0244 0.0250 0.0256 0.0262 0.0268 0.0274 0.0281 0.0287 0.0294 0.0301 0.0307 0.0314 0.0322 0.0329 0.0336 0.0344 0.0351 0.0359 0.0367 0.0375 0.0384 0.0392 0.0401 0.0409 0.0418 0.0427 0.0436 0.0446 0.0455 0.0465 0.0475 0.0485 0.0495 0.0505 0.0516 0.0526 0.0537 0.0548 0.0559 0.0571 0.0582 0.0594 0.0606 0.0618 0.0630 0.0643 0.0655 0.0668 0.0681 0.0694 0.0708 0.0721 0.0735 0.0749 0.0764 0.0778 0.0793 0.0808 0.0823 0.0838 0.0853 0.0869 0.0885 0.0901 0.0918 0.0934 0.0951 0.0968 0.0985 0.1003 0.1020 0.1038 0.1056 0.1075 0.1093 0.1112 0.1131 0.1151 0.1170 0.1190 0.1210 0.1230 0.1251 0.1271 0.1292 0.1314 0.1335 0.1357 0.1379 0.1401 0.1423 0.1446 0.1469 0.1492 0.1515 0.1539 0.1562 0.1587 0.1611 0.1635 0.1660 0.1685 0.1711 0.1736 0.1762 0.1788 0.1814 0.1841 0.1867 0.1894 0.1922 0.1949 0.1977 0.2005 0.2033 0.2061 0.2090 0.2119. 0.2148 0.2177 0.2206 0.2236 0.2266 0.2296 0.2327 0.2358 0.2389 0.2420 0.2451 0.2483 0.2514 0.2546 0.2578 0.2611 0.2643 0.2676 0.2709 0.2743 0.2776 0.2810 0.2843 0.2877 0.2912 0.2946 0.2981 0.3015 0.3050 0.3085 0.3121 0.3156 0.3192 0.3228 0.3264 0.3300 0.3336 0.3372 0.3409 0.3446 0.3483 0.3520 0.3557 0.3594 0.3632 0.3669 0.3707 0.3745 0.3783 0.3821 0.3859 0.3897 0.3936 03974 0.4013 04052 0.4090 0.4129 0.4168 0.4207 0.4247 0.4286 0.4325 04364 0.4404 0.4443 0.4483 0.4522 0.4562 0.4602 0.4641 0.4681 0.4721 04761 0.4801 04840 0.4880 0.4920 0.4960 0.5000 -3.9 -3.8 -3.7 For 2-3.90, the areas are 0.0000 to four decimal places. -3.6 -35 -2.9 -2.8 -2.7 -2.6 -25 -2.3 -2.2 -2.1 -2.0 -1.9 -1.8 -1.7 -1.6 -15 -1.4 -1.3 -1.2 -1.1 -1.0 -0.9 -0.8 -0.7 -0.6 -05 -0.4 -0.3 -0.2 -0.1 -0.0

Q:

In Exercise, use Table II to obtain the required z-scores. Illustrate your work with graphs. 6.71 Obtain the z-score for which the area under the standard normal curve to its left is 0.025. Determine z0.33. Table II TABLE II Areas under the standard normal curve A 0.09 0.08 0.07 Second decimal place in z 0.06 0.05 0.04 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.00 0.0000 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0006 0.0006 0.0006 0.0006 0.0006 0.0007 0.0007 -3.2 0.0007 0.0007 0.0008 0.0008 0.0008 0.0008 0.0009 0.0009 0.0009 0.0010 -3.1 0.0010 0.0010 0.0011 0.0011 00011 0.0012 0.0012 0.0013 0.0013 0.0013. -3.0 -3.4 -3.3 0.0014 0.0014 0.0015 0.0015 0.0016 0.0016 0.0017 0.0018 0.0018 0.0019 0.0019 0.0020 0.0021 0.0021 0.0022 0.0023 0.0023 0.0024 0.0025 0.0026 0.0026 0.0027 0.0028 0.0029 0.0030 0.0031 0.0032 0.0033 0.0034 0.0035 0.0036 0.0037 0.0038 0.0039 0.0040 0.0041 0.0043 0.0044 0.0045 0.0047 0.0048 0.0049 0.0051 0.0052 0.0054 0.0055 0.0057 0.0059 0.0060 0.0062 0.0064 0.0066 0.0068 0.0069 0.0071 0.0073 0.0075 0.0078 0.0080 0.0082 0.0084 0.0087 0.0089 0.0091 0.0094 0.0096 0.0099 0.0102 0.0104 0.0107 0.0110 00113 0.0116 0.0119 0.0122 0.0125 0.0129 0.0132 0.0136 0.0139 0.0143 0.0146 0.0150 0.0154 0.0158 0.0162 0.0166 0.0170 0.0174 0.0179 0.0183 0.0188 0.0192 0.0197 0.0202 0.0207 0.0212 0.0217 0.0222 0.0228 0.0233 0.0239 0.0244 0.0250 0.0256 0.0262 0.0268 0.0274 0.0281 0.0287 0.0294 0.0301 0.0307 0.0314 0.0322 0.0329 0.0336 0.0344 0.0351 0.0359 0.0367 0.0375 0.0384 0.0392 0.0401 0.0409 0.0418 0.0427 0.0436 0.0446 0.0455 0.0465 0.0475 0.0485 0.0495 0.0505 0.0516 0.0526 0.0537 0.0548 0.0559 0.0571 0.0582 0.0594 0.0606 0.0618 0.0630 0.0643 0.0655 0.0668 0.0681 0.0694 0.0708 0.0721 0.0735 0.0749 0.0764 0.0778 0.0793 0.0808 0.0823 0.0838 0.0853 0.0869 0.0885 0.0901 0.0918 0.0934 0.0951 0.0968 0.0985 0.1003 0.1020 0.1038 0.1056 0.1075 0.1093 0.1112 0.1131 0.1151 0.1170 0.1190 0.1210 0.1230 0.1251 0.1271 0.1292 0.1314 0.1335 0.1357 0.1379 0.1401 0.1423 0.1446 0.1469 0.1492 0.1515 0.1539 0.1562 0.1587 0.1611 0.1635 0.1660 0.1685 0.1711 0.1736 0.1762 0.1788 0.1814 0.1841 0.1867 0.1894 0.1922 0.1949 0.1977 0.2005 0.2033 0.2061 0.2090 0.2119. 0.2148 0.2177 0.2206 0.2236 0.2266 0.2296 0.2327 0.2358 0.2389 0.2420 0.2451 0.2483 0.2514 0.2546 0.2578 0.2611 0.2643 0.2676 0.2709 0.2743 0.2776 0.2810 0.2843 0.2877 0.2912 0.2946 0.2981 0.3015 0.3050 0.3085 0.3121 0.3156 0.3192 0.3228 0.3264 0.3300 0.3336 0.3372 0.3409 0.3446 0.3483 0.3520 0.3557 0.3594 0.3632 0.3669 0.3707 0.3745 0.3783 0.3821 0.3859 0.3897 0.3936 03974 0.4013 04052 0.4090 0.4129 0.4168 0.4207 0.4247 0.4286 0.4325 04364 0.4404 0.4443 0.4483 0.4522 0.4562 0.4602 0.4641 0.4681 0.4721 04761 0.4801 04840 0.4880 0.4920 0.4960 0.5000 -3.9 -3.8 -3.7 For 2-3.90, the areas are 0.0000 to four decimal places. -3.6 -35 -2.9 -2.8 -2.7 -2.6 -25 -2.3 -2.2 -2.1 -2.0 -1.9 -1.8 -1.7 -1.6 -15 -1.4 -1.3 -1.2 -1.1 -1.0 -0.9 -0.8 -0.7 -0.6 -05 -0.4 -0.3 -0.2 -0.1 -0.0

Q:

In Exercise, use Table II to obtain the required z-scores. Illustrate your work with graphs. 6.71 Obtain the z-score for which the area under the standard normal curve to its left is 0.025. Determine z0.33. Table II TABLE II Areas under the standard normal curve A 0.09 0.08 0.07 Second decimal place in z 0.06 0.05 0.04 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.00 0.0000 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0006 0.0006 0.0006 0.0006 0.0006 0.0007 0.0007 -3.2 0.0007 0.0007 0.0008 0.0008 0.0008 0.0008 0.0009 0.0009 0.0009 0.0010 -3.1 0.0010 0.0010 0.0011 0.0011 00011 0.0012 0.0012 0.0013 0.0013 0.0013. -3.0 -3.4 -3.3 0.0014 0.0014 0.0015 0.0015 0.0016 0.0016 0.0017 0.0018 0.0018 0.0019 0.0019 0.0020 0.0021 0.0021 0.0022 0.0023 0.0023 0.0024 0.0025 0.0026 0.0026 0.0027 0.0028 0.0029 0.0030 0.0031 0.0032 0.0033 0.0034 0.0035 0.0036 0.0037 0.0038 0.0039 0.0040 0.0041 0.0043 0.0044 0.0045 0.0047 0.0048 0.0049 0.0051 0.0052 0.0054 0.0055 0.0057 0.0059 0.0060 0.0062 0.0064 0.0066 0.0068 0.0069 0.0071 0.0073 0.0075 0.0078 0.0080 0.0082 0.0084 0.0087 0.0089 0.0091 0.0094 0.0096 0.0099 0.0102 0.0104 0.0107 0.0110 00113 0.0116 0.0119 0.0122 0.0125 0.0129 0.0132 0.0136 0.0139 0.0143 0.0146 0.0150 0.0154 0.0158 0.0162 0.0166 0.0170 0.0174 0.0179 0.0183 0.0188 0.0192 0.0197 0.0202 0.0207 0.0212 0.0217 0.0222 0.0228 0.0233 0.0239 0.0244 0.0250 0.0256 0.0262 0.0268 0.0274 0.0281 0.0287 0.0294 0.0301 0.0307 0.0314 0.0322 0.0329 0.0336 0.0344 0.0351 0.0359 0.0367 0.0375 0.0384 0.0392 0.0401 0.0409 0.0418 0.0427 0.0436 0.0446 0.0455 0.0465 0.0475 0.0485 0.0495 0.0505 0.0516 0.0526 0.0537 0.0548 0.0559 0.0571 0.0582 0.0594 0.0606 0.0618 0.0630 0.0643 0.0655 0.0668 0.0681 0.0694 0.0708 0.0721 0.0735 0.0749 0.0764 0.0778 0.0793 0.0808 0.0823 0.0838 0.0853 0.0869 0.0885 0.0901 0.0918 0.0934 0.0951 0.0968 0.0985 0.1003 0.1020 0.1038 0.1056 0.1075 0.1093 0.1112 0.1131 0.1151 0.1170 0.1190 0.1210 0.1230 0.1251 0.1271 0.1292 0.1314 0.1335 0.1357 0.1379 0.1401 0.1423 0.1446 0.1469 0.1492 0.1515 0.1539 0.1562 0.1587 0.1611 0.1635 0.1660 0.1685 0.1711 0.1736 0.1762 0.1788 0.1814 0.1841 0.1867 0.1894 0.1922 0.1949 0.1977 0.2005 0.2033 0.2061 0.2090 0.2119. 0.2148 0.2177 0.2206 0.2236 0.2266 0.2296 0.2327 0.2358 0.2389 0.2420 0.2451 0.2483 0.2514 0.2546 0.2578 0.2611 0.2643 0.2676 0.2709 0.2743 0.2776 0.2810 0.2843 0.2877 0.2912 0.2946 0.2981 0.3015 0.3050 0.3085 0.3121 0.3156 0.3192 0.3228 0.3264 0.3300 0.3336 0.3372 0.3409 0.3446 0.3483 0.3520 0.3557 0.3594 0.3632 0.3669 0.3707 0.3745 0.3783 0.3821 0.3859 0.3897 0.3936 03974 0.4013 04052 0.4090 0.4129 0.4168 0.4207 0.4247 0.4286 0.4325 04364 0.4404 0.4443 0.4483 0.4522 0.4562 0.4602 0.4641 0.4681 0.4721 04761 0.4801 04840 0.4880 0.4920 0.4960 0.5000 -3.9 -3.8 -3.7 For 2-3.90, the areas are 0.0000 to four decimal places. -3.6 -35 -2.9 -2.8 -2.7 -2.6 -25 -2.3 -2.2 -2.1 -2.0 -1.9 -1.8 -1.7 -1.6 -15 -1.4 -1.3 -1.2 -1.1 -1.0 -0.9 -0.8 -0.7 -0.6 -05 -0.4 -0.3 -0.2 -0.1 -0.0

Q:

In Exercise, use Table II to obtain the required z-scores. Illustrate your work with graphs. 6.71 Obtain the z-score for which the area under the standard normal curve to its left is 0.025. Find the following z-scores.a. z0.03 b. z0.005 Table II TABLE II Areas under the standard normal curve A 0.09 0.08 0.07 Second decimal place in z 0.06 0.05 0.04 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.00 0.0000 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0001 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0002 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0004 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0005 0.0006 0.0006 0.0006 0.0006 0.0006 0.0007 0.0007 -3.2 0.0007 0.0007 0.0008 0.0008 0.0008 0.0008 0.0009 0.0009 0.0009 0.0010 -3.1 0.0010 0.0010 0.0011 0.0011 00011 0.0012 0.0012 0.0013 0.0013 0.0013. -3.0 -3.4 -3.3 0.0014 0.0014 0.0015 0.0015 0.0016 0.0016 0.0017 0.0018 0.0018 0.0019 0.0019 0.0020 0.0021 0.0021 0.0022 0.0023 0.0023 0.0024 0.0025 0.0026 0.0026 0.0027 0.0028 0.0029 0.0030 0.0031 0.0032 0.0033 0.0034 0.0035 0.0036 0.0037 0.0038 0.0039 0.0040 0.0041 0.0043 0.0044 0.0045 0.0047 0.0048 0.0049 0.0051 0.0052 0.0054 0.0055 0.0057 0.0059 0.0060 0.0062 0.0064 0.0066 0.0068 0.0069 0.0071 0.0073 0.0075 0.0078 0.0080 0.0082 0.0084 0.0087 0.0089 0.0091 0.0094 0.0096 0.0099 0.0102 0.0104 0.0107 0.0110 00113 0.0116 0.0119 0.0122 0.0125 0.0129 0.0132 0.0136 0.0139 0.0143 0.0146 0.0150 0.0154 0.0158 0.0162 0.0166 0.0170 0.0174 0.0179 0.0183 0.0188 0.0192 0.0197 0.0202 0.0207 0.0212 0.0217 0.0222 0.0228 0.0233 0.0239 0.0244 0.0250 0.0256 0.0262 0.0268 0.0274 0.0281 0.0287 0.0294 0.0301 0.0307 0.0314 0.0322 0.0329 0.0336 0.0344 0.0351 0.0359 0.0367 0.0375 0.0384 0.0392 0.0401 0.0409 0.0418 0.0427 0.0436 0.0446 0.0455 0.0465 0.0475 0.0485 0.0495 0.0505 0.0516 0.0526 0.0537 0.0548 0.0559 0.0571 0.0582 0.0594 0.0606 0.0618 0.0630 0.0643 0.0655 0.0668 0.0681 0.0694 0.0708 0.0721 0.0735 0.0749 0.0764 0.0778 0.0793 0.0808 0.0823 0.0838 0.0853 0.0869 0.0885 0.0901 0.0918 0.0934 0.0951 0.0968 0.0985 0.1003 0.1020 0.1038 0.1056 0.1075 0.1093 0.1112 0.1131 0.1151 0.1170 0.1190 0.1210 0.1230 0.1251 0.1271 0.1292 0.1314 0.1335 0.1357 0.1379 0.1401 0.1423 0.1446 0.1469 0.1492 0.1515 0.1539 0.1562 0.1587 0.1611 0.1635 0.1660 0.1685 0.1711 0.1736 0.1762 0.1788 0.1814 0.1841 0.1867 0.1894 0.1922 0.1949 0.1977 0.2005 0.2033 0.2061 0.2090 0.2119. 0.2148 0.2177 0.2206 0.2236 0.2266 0.2296 0.2327 0.2358 0.2389 0.2420 0.2451 0.2483 0.2514 0.2546 0.2578 0.2611 0.2643 0.2676 0.2709 0.2743 0.2776 0.2810 0.2843 0.2877 0.2912 0.2946 0.2981 0.3015 0.3050 0.3085 0.3121 0.3156 0.3192 0.3228 0.3264 0.3300 0.3336 0.3372 0.3409 0.3446 0.3483 0.3520 0.3557 0.3594 0.3632 0.3669 0.3707 0.3745 0.3783 0.3821 0.3859 0.3897 0.3936 03974 0.4013 04052 0.4090 0.4129 0.4168 0.4207 0.4247 0.4286 0.4325 04364 0.4404 0.4443 0.4483 0.4522 0.4562 0.4602 0.4641 0.4681 0.4721 04761 0.4801 04840 0.4880 0.4920 0.4960 0.5000 -3.9 -3.8 -3.7 For 2-3.90, the areas are 0.0000 to four decimal places. -3.6 -35 -2.9 -2.8 -2.7 -2.6 -25 -2.3 -2.2 -2.1 -2.0 -1.9 -1.8 -1.7 -1.6 -15 -1.4 -1.3 -1.2 -1.1 -1.0 -0.9 -0.8 -0.7 -0.6 -05 -0.4 -0.3 -0.2 -0.1 -0.0

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